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Obj. ID: 39382  Torah case wrapper, Libya, circa 1930

© Gross Family Collection, Photographer: Bar Hama, Ardon, -.

2 image(s)

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Name/Title
Torah case wrapper | Unknown
Object Detail
Date
circa 1930
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Unknown (Unknown)
Origin
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community
Location
Unknown |
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Gross Family Collection No.
048.027.002
Material/Technique
Embroidery and Application on cotton velvet, Galoon border in silk and silver thread sewn to the velvet, Embroidery in Silver thread tape, Silver and gold silk fringes, Cotton satin backing, Linen backing for embroidered velvet.
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height: 48.5 cm, Length: 100 cm
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Hallmark
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Description

The following description was prepared by William Gross:

In the Ashkenazi and Sephardi tradition the Torah Scroll is protected when not being read by a textile covering, often very beautifully embroidered. In the Mizrachi and Romaniote traditions, the Sefer Torah is generally not robed in a mantle, but rather housed in an ornamental wooden case which protects the scroll, called a "tik".

The custom in both Tunisia and Libya was to wrap the multi-faceted wooden Tik in a fabric. This Torah Tik wrapper is made with a velvet center piece is decorated by the depiction of a large hamsa and two fish, typical amuletic symbols used in both Libya and Tunisia. The velvet fabric is bordered by woven fabric ribbons, galoons, on which are depicted the star and crescent as well as the talismanic hamsa. The loops on the top of the textile engaged metal pieces around the top the wooden torah container, or Tik, in which Libyan and Tunisian Jews kept their Torah scrolls. The donor, Moshe Tshuvah, carries a typically Libyan name. One of the members of this family has become one of the leaders of the Israeli economy.

Inscription: The Servant of the Lord Moshe Tshuva, may his end be a good one.

Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
History/Provenance
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography
Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
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Researcher
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Architectural Drawings
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Computer Reconsdivuction
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Language Editor
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