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Obj. ID: 53498
Memorials
  Holocaust Memorial at the JCC in Rochester, NY, USA, 1982

© Vladimir Levin, Photographer: Levin, Vladimir, 2024

Name of Monument

No official name

What/Who is commemorated?

Jewish victims of the Holocaust

Description

The monument in the form of a stylized menorah stands in the inner courtyard of the JCC of Greater Rochester, NY. It is situated in front of a grey wall of the building, on which the inscription זכור (Remember) is placed.

A seven-branched menorah stands on a concrete pedestal, which bears a plaque with an inscription. Its branches are of different height, with stylized fires, and two stylized pieces of barbed wire appear on its base, along with a broken post.

In 1986, the monument was supplemented by nine rectangular plaques with the names of Holocaust victims, with attached boxes for candles.

After 2014, three round-headed plaques with the names of Holocaust survivors who lived in Greater Rochester were added.

Inscriptions

Plaque on the pedestal of the menorah: [was covered by snow at the time of documentation]

Above the plaques with victims’ names:

Dedicated to the memory of the fathers and mothers, husbands and wives and children who perished
in the Holocaust… By their loved ones who survived and live in peace in Rochester, New York

On the central bronze plaque:

Remembered and not to be forgotten
are the uncounted number of souls
whose names perished with them.
Remember

געדענק  זכור
[Yiddish and Hebrew: Remember!]

Dedicated
September 14, 1986
י אלול תשמו
[10 Elul (5)746]

 

On three plaques with survivors’ names:

In honor of our cherished
Rochester Holocaust survivors

We cherish all, both known and unknown, forever…

 

Text on a plaque in the JCC hall:

The Holocaust Memorial
Menorah           Mazevah

The seven branch menorah is the oldest Jewish religious
symbol. It served to give light in our first Houses of God, the
Tabernacle in the wilderness and the Temple in Jerusalem.
To celebrate the triumph of Hanukkah, an eighth branch was added.
To commemorate the Holocaust, we diminish the menorah’s branches to six to symbolize the Six Million.
Menorahs of celebration are graceful in form, beautiful to behold.
Our Menorah of Commemoration, angular, jagged, strong,
has been forged to arrest our attention, to assail our memory.
The gold of the lives of our martyred brethren and the red of
their blood are its colors.
The barbed wire about the trunk recalls to us death and
destruction. The living flames rising from the branches affirm
the commitment to life of the Jewish people.
The Holocaust Memorial we dedicate this day is:
a Memorial Mazevah for more than two
thousand eight hundred members of our families who
perished in the Holocaust … who live on in our
memories … who, we shall never forget …
a Memorial Menorah for our children,
through whom we shall live … so they should
remember…

Dedicated on this Day of Remembrance and Commemoration
2 Iyar 5742        April 25, 1982

Delivered by
Rabbi Abraham J. Karp, Chairman
The Holocaust Commission
of the
Jewish Community Federation of Rochester
Sculpture: David Klass

Commissioned by

Holocaust Memorial Commission of the Jewish Community Federation of Rochester


Summary and Remarks
Remarks

22 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Holocaust Memorial at the JCC in Rochester, NY | Unknown
Object Detail
Monument Setting
JCC
{"12":"Memorial installed in all types of non-synagogue Jewish Community Center."}
Date
1982
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Klass, David (artist and sculptor)
{"5319":"Jewish American"}
Origin
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Unknown |
Congregation
Unknown
Location
United States of America (USA) | New York | Rochester, NY
| JCC, 1200 Edgewood Ave, Rochester, NY 14618
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Iconographical Subject
Material / Technique
Welded brass on copper
Concretes
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height: 305 cm (10 feet)
Pedestal: 205 cm x 223 cm
Survivors’ plaque: 138 cm x 56 cm
Victims’ plaque: 122 cm x 56 cm
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature

Lower left: David Klass / Sculptor 1982

Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance

According to the artist’s signature, the monument was created in 1982. It was unveiled on Sunday, April 25, 1982, “before the crowd of approximately 700” (The Jewish Ledger, May 6, 1982, p. 15).

In 1986, nine bronze plaques with the names of Holocaust victims were affixed on the wall behind the monument.

About 2014, bronze plaques with the names of survivors were added. In the photographs from 2015, there are four such plaques, placed in pair on the both side of the plaques with victims’ names. During the documentation in 2024, three survivors’ plaques were found, all of them affixed to the wall between the menorah monument and the victims’ plaques (https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=839695702758547&set=pb.100066595117028.-2207520000).

Main Surveys & Excavations
Sources
Type
Documenter
Vladimir Levin | 2024
Author of description
Vladimir Levin | 2024
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
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Language Editor
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Donor
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Negative/Photo. No.
The following information on this monument will be completed: