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Obj. ID: 49994
Jewish Funerary Art
  Memorial to the Lowy and Friedman Family Members Who Perished in the Holocaust in the Jewish Cemetery in Čantavir, Serbia

© Olga Ungar, Photographer: Ungar, Olga, 2023

Memorial Name

No official name

Who is Commemorated

Lowy and Friedmann Family members who perished in the Holocaust.

Description

The Löwy and Friedmann family graves, standing one next to another, were erected before the war and the names of the victims were later engraved on them, at the bottom part. Both are made of black granite and have the shape of an obelisk.

On the grave of Simon Löwy (1844–1924), names of the family members who perished in Auschwitz are added after the war.

On the second grave, of Simon Löwy's wife, Rozália Löwy née Goldabeiter (1848–1941), are engraved the names of victims of Auschwitz and Hungarian forced labor in the territory of occupied Ukraine. The epitaphs of the deceased who died before the Holocaust are written in Hebrew and Hungarian. The names of the victims were written in Hungarian spelling.

Inscriptions

The grave of Simon Löwy's obelisk

Hebrew

פ"נ איש יקר רוח ישר ונאמן
החבר שמחה יהודה בן מו"ה [מורנו הרב] גרשון הלוי ע"ה [עליו השלום]
נפטר כ"ד ונקבר כ"ה בטבת
בן שמונים שנה שנת תרפ"ד ק"
תנצבה
שם אמו מרת אידל

Translation:  Here is buried a dear, honest, and faithful man peace be upon him fellow member of the community Simcha Yehuda the son of our teacher Rabbi Gershon Halevi, peace be upon him, died 24 in Tevet and was buried 25 in Tevet, eighty years old, in the year 5684. May his memory be a blessing. His mother's name is Mrs. Idel. 

Hungarian

It nyugszik a szerető hű férj és jóságos apa
Löwy Simon
elhunyt 1924 január 1.
vallásos és istenfélő életének
80-ik évében

Emlékét szeretettel örzik
hitvese és gyermekei

Translation:  Here rests the loving faithful husband and kind father Simon Löwy, who died on January 1, 1924, in the 80th year of his observant and God-fearing life. / The memory is kept with love by his wife and children. 

 

The grave of Simon Löwy's base (Hungarian)

Auschwitz 1944
Löwyné Gottlieb Mária 1898.
Löwy Rezső 1887.
Löwy Tibor 1932.
Gottliebné Schlesinger Aurelia.
Gábor László.

Translation:  Auschwitz 1944. / Mária Löwy née Gottlieb 1989. Rezső Löwy 1887. Tibor Löwy 1932. / Aurelia Gottlieb née Schlesinger, László Gábor.

 

The grave of Rozália Löwy

Hebrew

פ"נ האישה החשובה והיקרה מרת
חיי שרה ע"ה
אשת הה"ר שמחה יהודא הלוי
"נפטרה השם טוב ביום ח
לחדש טבת ונקברה ביום
ט" בשנת תשא בפ"ק [בלי פקר קטן]
פה  טשאנסאווער
תנצבה
ושם אמה יוכבאד 

Translation:  Here is buried the important and dear wife Chaya Sara peace be upon her. Wife of Rabbi Simcha Yehuda Halevi. She died in a good name on the 8th of the month of Tevet and was buried on the 9th in the year 5701. Here in Čantavir. May her memory be a blessing. And her mother's name is Yokheved.

 

Hungarian

It nyugszik a szeretett jó anyánk Löwy Simonné Goldarbeiter Rozália elhunyt 1941
január 7. vallásos és istenfélő életének 93-ik évében.
'Emlékét szeretettel örzik gyermekei

Translation: Here rests our beloved mother, the wife of Simon Löwy, Rozália née Goldarbeiter, who died on January 7, 1941, in the 93rd year of her observant and God-fearing life. / The memory is kept with love by children. 

 

Friedmann Márta 1908–1988

Context: The survivor Marta Friedmann's grandparents were Simon and Rozália Löwy. Her mother was their daughter Etel who married Mór Friedmann. Her parents and her siblings – Géza, Renee, Ilus and József were all murdered in Auschwitz. One can assume that it was probably Marta Friedmann, who added the names of her murdered family members to the existing family grave


Victim Names

Friedmanné Löwy Etel 1872.
Friedman Mór 1865.
Friedman Géza 1896.
Friedman Reneé 1902.
Kleinné Friedman Ilus 1905.
Klein József 1904 Ukrajna 1943.
Klein Marika 1936.

Commissioned by

Marta Friedmann

Summary and Remarks

14 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Memorial to the Lowy and Friedman Family Members Who Perished in the Holocaust in the Jewish Cemetery in Čantavir | Unknown
Object Detail
The commemorative inscriptions to the victims were added to the existing family graves.
Monument Setting
Date
1924
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Unknown |
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Serbia | Vojvodina | Čantavir (Чантавир)
| 52-56 Kanjiška Street
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Iconographical Subject
Unknown |
Material / Technique
Black Granite
Concrete
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
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Depth
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Thickness
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Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
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Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
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Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance

Jews began settling in Čantavir in the late 18th century. The Jewish community with school was established in the mid-19th century. The cemetery was founded in 1847. The synagogue was built in 1860.

Only 14 Jews survived the Holocaust. The synagogue was destroyed in 1950, and no memorial plaque exists on the site. There are about 110 graves in the cemetery, only a few from the aftermath of World War II. The cemetery in Čantavir is surrounded by courtyards of private houses. It is maintained by Robert who is the only one who has an open passage to the cemetery from his house. Thanks to him, the cemetery is preserved and well-maintained.

There are commemorative inscriptions on several graves of the Holocaust victims. A typical representative of such graves is the Löwy and Friedmann family graves. Both gravestones were erected before the war and the names of the victims were later on engraved on them.

Marta Friedmann survived the Holocaust and was buried in this family grave ('Friedmann Márta 1908–1988'). Marta Friedmann's grandparents were Simon and Rozália Löwy. Her mother was their daughter Etel who married Mór Friedmann. Her parents and siblings – Géza, Renee, Ilus, and József were all murdered in Auschwitz. One can assume that it was probably Marta Friedmann, who added the names of her murdered family members to the existing family grave.

The Subotica Municipality maintains the memorials.

Main Surveys & Excavations
Sources

Archives of the Jewish Community, Novi Sad, "Evidencija preživelih Jevreja u Jugoslaviji 1946, I-II"

Ivanković, Mladenka. Jevreji u Jugoslaviji 1944 - 1952. Godine. Beograd: Institut za noviju istoriju Srbije, 2009.

"Memorials in Čantavir," Locations (Vojvodina Holocaust Memorials Project), https://www.vhmproject.org/en-US/Locations/Memorials/10 (accessed June 11, 2023)

Šosberger, Pavle. Sinagoge u Vojvodini: Spomanica minulog vremena (Novi Sad, 1998)

Žrtve Rata 1941-1945: Jevreji. Belgrade: Savezni zavod za statistiku, 1966.
Type
Documenter
|
Author of description
Olga Ungar | 2023
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
|
Language Editor
Adam Frisch | 2023
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.
The following information on this monument will be completed:
Unknown |