Object Alone

Obj. ID: 52596  Post-Soviet Monument on the Mass Grave in the New Jewish Cemetery in Ludza, Latvia, 1990s

© Vladimir Levin, Photographer: Levin, Vladimir, 4.2022

Memorial Name

No official name

Who is Commemorated?

Victims of the Ludza Ghetto, reinterred in the cemetery after WWII.

Description:

This is a mass grave of Jewish victims from the Ludza Ghetto reinterred here after WWII.

Three stelas are situated on the grave.

The oldest one, in the middle, was made of stone in the 1950s (see here)

The second stele, on the right, was made of red granite in 1961 (see here). 

The third stele, on the left, was erected in the 1990s. It is made of black marble and bears a Star of David and the names of 12 victims from the Lovtsov, Atamovich, and Ozband Families.

Inscription

Russian:

Жертвы фашистских убийц в августе 1941 года

[List of 12 names]

Скорбящие родные

Translation: Victims of Fascist murderers in August of 1941. [List of 12 names]. Mourning relatives.

Commissioned by

Relatives of the Lovtsov, Atamovich, and Ozband Families

Documenter
Vladimir Levin, Milda Jakulytė | 2022
Author of description
Vladimir Levin | 2023
Architectural Drawings
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Computer Reconsdivuction
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Section Head
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Language Editor
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Donor
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1 image(s)

Name / Title
Post-Soviet Monument on the Mass Grave in the New Jewish Cemetery in Ludza | Unknown
Monument Setting
Object Detail
Completion Date
1990s
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Location
Latvia | Latgale | Ludza
| J. Soikāna St.
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Iconographical Subject
Textual Content
Languages of inscription
Shape / Form
Material / Technique
Marble
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
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Panel Measurements
0
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
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Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
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Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
History

The Nazi German troops entered Ludza on 3 July 1941. On the following day, arrests of Jewish refugees and “Soviet activists” began. 25 people from among the arrestees were shot on the outskirts of the town, in the vicinity of a brick factory, on July 15, 1941. A ghetto was established in Ludza in mid-July 1941. 35 old Jews, including rabbi Benzion Don-Ihie, were shot at the end of July 1941 at the intersection of Rēzekne St. with Parka St, Liepājas St. and Rupniecibas St. After the war they were reinterred in the Jewish cemetery. 10 more Jews were shot at “Lauderi” farm at the end of July 1941. They were also reinterred in the Jewish cemetery.

A mass murder of Jews from the Ludza ghetto took place in mid–August 1941, when about 600 people were taken to the Cirma Lake (about 7 km from Ludza) and shot. 40 more Jews were shot there on August 27, 1941. In October 1941 part of the remaining ghetto inmates were sent to Daugavpils, some were shot near Dzerkaļi village, and others were shot near Kotāni village on November 13, 1941. The last inmates of the ghetto were murdered in Garbari Forest on April 3, 1942. 

The reburial of the victims took place in the Jewish cemetery after WWII. Rabbi Benzion Don-Ihie was reinterred in a separate grave (see here).

The first monument with Hebrew and Russian inscriptions was probably erected in the 1950s. Its Hebrew epitaph is similar to the epitaph on the monument near the cemetery in Rēzekne (see here).

The second monument was probably erected in 1961. It is identical to the monument in Zilupre (see here) and very similar to the monument in the Garbari Forest near Ludza (see here).

The third monument was erected by the relatives of several families in the 1990s.

In the 1970s, commemorative events in Ludza were reported in the Soviet Latvian press (Zeltser, 199).

Main Surveys & Excavations
Sources

"Holocaust Memorial Places in Latvia," a website by the Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Latvia, http://memorialplaces.lu.lv/memorial-places/latgale/ludza-municipality-the-ludza-jewish-cemetery/.

Meler, Meyer, Jewish Latvia: Sites to Remember (Tel-Aviv: Association of Latvian and Estonian Jews in Israel, 2013), p. 239.

Meler, Meyer, Mesta nashei pamiati: Evreiskie obshchiny Latvii, unichtozhennye v Kholokoste (Riga: by the author, 2010), p. 270.

Rochko, Josif, Jewish Latgale: Guidebook (Daugavpils, by the author, 2018), p. 36.

Zeltser, Arkadi, Unwelcome Memory: Holocaust Monuments in the Soviet Union, trans. A.S. Brown (Jerusalem: Yad Vashem, 2018), p. 199.

http://memorialplaces.lu.lv/memorial-places/latgale/ludza-municipality-the-ludza-jewish-cemetery/

Type
The following information on this monument will be completed: