Object Alone

Obj. ID: 42835  Holocaust Memorial in the Jewish Section of El Batan Cemetery in Quito, Ecuador, 1996

© Michele Migliori, Photographer: Migliori, Michele, 2020

Who is Commemorated?

Jewish Victims of the Holocaust

Description

The monument stands close to the entrance of the Jewish section of El Batan Municipal cemetery, and it is surrounded by four palm trees. The monument consists of two longitudinal blocks made from concrete positioned one in front of another. Each block has carved holes on both sides made so that visitors can insert stones in them. Each block features the memorial prayer Yizkor on the one side and the Kaddish on the other side as well as names of concentration camps, ghettos, and European cities.

The internal side of one of the blocks is decorated with Magen David and an additional dedication in Spanish. 

Inscription

On the external side of the panel seen from the entrance, there are the memorial prayer Yizkor in Hebrew (on the left side) and the names of concentration camps and European cities (on the right side).

On the left side:

 יזכור אלוהים כל אחינו
בני ישראל שמסרו נפשם
על קדוש השם אנא
ישמע בחיינו הד גבורתם
ומסירותם 
ויראה
במעשינו טהר לבם
ותהיינו נפשותיהם
צרורות בצרור החיים
ותהו מנוחתם כבוד. שבע
שמחות את פניך נעימות
בימינך נצח. אמן

Translation: May God remember our brethren, who gave their lives for the sanctification of God’s name. May their bravery, their dedication, and their purity be reflected in our lives. May their souls be bound up in the bond of life. May they rest in peace forever in God’s presence. Amen.

On the right side:

Dachau
Buchenwal[d]
Maurhausen
Lublin
Sachsenhause
Vilna
Bergen Belsen
Treblinka
Terezin
Opole
Maidanek

The internal side of the panel bears the inscription in Spanish on the left side:

In memoria de
nuestros hermanos
victimas inocentres
de la barbarie
Nazi

Translation: In memory of our brethren innocent victims of barbarity of Nazis

 

On the right side: the Kaddish prayer:

יתגדל ויתקדש שמה
רבא 
בעלמא די ברא
כרעותה, וימליך
מלכותה בחייכון וביומיכון ובחיי
דכל בית ישראל
בעגלא ובזמן קריב
ואמרו אמן

Translation: May God’s great name be exalted and hallowed throughout the created world, as is God’s wish. May God’s sovereignty soon be established, in your lifetime and in your days, and in the days of all the House of Israel. And respond with: Amen.

 

On the external side of the second panel, there is the memorial prayer Yizkor in Spanish on the left side and the names of concentration camps and cities of Europe on the right side.

On the left side:

Recuerda, Oh Dios, las almas de
nuestros hermanos que sacrificaron
sus vidas por la santificación de su
nombre. Haz que su heroísmo y
sacrificio encuentren eco en
nuestras vidas y que la
purez de sus corazones sea
flejada en nuestras acciones.
Haz que sus almas
gocen de la vida eterna y de
la quietud. Tu presencia nos
colmará de alegría y tu poder
nos proporcionará
las eternas delicias.
Amen.

Translation: May God remember our brethren, who gave their lives for the sanctification of God’s name. May their bravery, their dedication, and their purity be reflected in our lives. May their souls be bound up in the bond of life. May they rest in peace forever in God’s presence. Amen.

On the right side:

Melk
Chichelnik
Murafa
Mogolew
Berschaw
Oranienburg
Gurs
Argeles
Rabensbruk
Sered
Ghetto de
Varsovia
Auschwitz
Stutthof
Guetto de Kovno

The internal side of the panel bears the Kaddish prayer in Spanish:

El mundo que Dios ha
creado según
 Su voluntad,
tribute gloria y
santificación al
nombre del Eterno. Que su
reino sea proclamado
prontamente
,
en 
vuestros días y en vida de
toda la congregación
de Israel. 
Amén

TranslationMay God’s great name be exalted and hallowed throughout the created world, as is God’s wish. May God’s sovereignty soon be established, in your lifetime and in your days, and in the days of all the House of Israel. Amen

Commissioned by

Quito Jewish Community

Documenter
|
Author of description
Michele Migliori, Anna Berezin | 2022
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconsdivuction
|
Section Head
|
Language Editor
|
Donor
|

5 image(s)

Name / Title
Holocaust Memorial in the Jewish Section of El Batan Municipal Cemetery in Quito | Unknown
Type of Monument
Monument Setting
Object Detail
Completion Date
1996
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Roitman, Sara
{"4107":"a Chilean-Israeli photographer based in Quito"}
Location
Ecuador | Quito
| Jewish section of El Batán municipal cemetery
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Iconographical Subject
Unknown |
Type of grave
Unknown
Material / Technique
Concrete
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
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Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
0
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
History

Until 1906, the Ecuadorian Constitution declared Roman Catholicism as the only religion of the state. Therefore, in order to immigrate to the country and acquire citizenship, being Catholic was a main requisite. It was only after 1914, when the Panama Canal was inaugurated, that Ecuador began witnessing European immigration on a large scale. According to the government’s official data, only four Jewish families were living in Ecuador in 1904. Even in 1917, a total of only 14 people of Jewish religion were known to be living in the country.

According to the Israeli historian Haim Avni, between 1933 and 1945, Ecuador hosted 3.200 European Jewish refugees, mostly coming from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Italy. By 1950, this number had grown to around 4.000, mostly thanks to Jews who survived the Holocaust and were resettled to Ecuador; some of whom had family members already living there.

The majority of these immigrants settled in in Quito, the capital city, and Guayaquil, the main port and economic focal point of the country. However, Jewish communities were also present in other cities, including Ambato, Cuenca, and Riobamba.

After 1950, most of the Jewish refugees who had first arrived in Ecuador relocated to the US, Canada, and Israel. Today, it is estimated that the Ecuadorian Jewish community amounts to around 600 members.

Main Surveys & Excavations
Sources

Migliori, Michele, "Ecuador: (European) Jewish Heritage in “an Unknown Country”," Jewish Heritage Europe. April 1, 2020, https://jewish-heritage-europe.eu/cemeteries/resources/essays-and-op-eds/ecuador/ (accessed January 6, 2022)

"Sara Roitman," Website, https://www.sararoitman.com/lang/es/biografia (accessed January 17, 2022)
Type
The following information on this monument will be completed: