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Obj. ID: 52732
Sacred and Ritual Objects
  Papercut Mizrah, Amsterdam, 1815

© Gross Family Collection, Photographer: Unknown, -

The following description was prepared by William Gross:

Papercutting or paper cutting is the art of cutting paper designs. The German term for the art form, Scherenschnitte, which means "scissor cuts", describes one of the techniques for cutting, the other being the use of a very sharp knife with the paper on a board. The artwork often has symmetry within the design, and common forms include silhouettes and all sorts of wall plaques. The art has evolved uniquely all over the world to adapt to different cultural styles. The oldest examples are from China of the 6th century.  By the eighth or ninth century, papercutting appeared in West Asia and in Turkey in the 16th century. Within another century, papercutting was being done in most of middle Europe.

Papercutting has been a Jewish art form since the 17th century, connected with various customs and ceremonies and associated with holidays and family life, although today the earliest surviving examples are from the 18th century.  Paper cuts are often decorated Ketubot (marriage contracts), Mizrachs, and other ornamental plaques for Festive occasions.  From the 18th century, papercutting had become a popular form for small religious artifacts such as Mizrachs and Shavuot decorations. In the 20th century, the art of Jewish papercutting was revived in Israel. Today it is most commonly used for Mizrachs and Ketubot.

Summary and Remarks
Remarks

1 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Papercut Mizrah | Unknown
Object Detail
Monument Setting
Unknown
Date
1815 (inscription)
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Unknown
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Unknown |
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Textual Content
Unknown |
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Shape / Form
Unknown
Material / Technique
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
Main Surveys & Excavations
Sources
Type
Documenter
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Author of description
William Gross |
Architectural Drawings
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Computer Reconstruction
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Section Head
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Language Editor
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Donor
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Negative/Photo. No.
The following information on this monument will be completed:
Unknown |