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Obj. ID: 48332
Memorials
  The Last Train Holocaust Memorial in The Ghetto Nuevo in Venice, Italy
To the main object: Ghetto Nuovo in Venice, Italy

© Vladimir Levin, Photographer: Levin, Vladimir, 2011

Memorial name

The Last Train

Who is Commemorated?

Venitian Jews killed in the Holocaust

Description

This memorial, set into a wall within the New Jewish Ghetto of Venice, focuses on a bronze bas-relief depicting streams of Jewish victims flowing from three boxcars to nazi soldiers in the foreground. the details and faces of those depicted on relief are intentionally left blurred. it is a depiction of a painting the artist of the relief, Arbit Blatas, created in 1980, also called The Last Train

The relief is set on an iron grate, behind which are large wooden boards that are lined horizontally, and are carved with the 246 names of Jews who were deported from the Venitian Ghetto during the Holocaust.

Inscription

[List of Names]

Donated by

The artist of the piece, Arbit Blatas

Summary and Remarks
Remarks

1 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
The Last Train Holocaust Memorial in The Ghetto Nuevo in Venice | Unknown
Object Detail
Monument Setting
Ghetto
Public street or square
{"3":"So-called by the Nazis to designate an enclosed area of enforced settlement of Jews within a previously built area in the city or town."}
Date
1993
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Origin
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Unknown |
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Italy | Veneto | Venice
| Ghetto Nuevo
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Iconographical Subject
T | Train
J | Jews
|
Textual Content
Languages of inscription
Material / Technique
Bronze
Iron
Wood
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
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Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
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Colors
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Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
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Pricking
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Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
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Signature
Colophon
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Watermark
Hallmark
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Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
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Decoration Program
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance

The Nuevo Ghetto of Venice, the oldest ghetto in the world, was first designated as such for Jews on March 16th, 1516. From that day until 1796, when they were removed by Napoleon, gates and guards kept the Jews of Venice segregated from the rest of the population, though non-Jewish Venetians could go into the ghetto during the day (Sacerdoti 1989, 70-71). Wealthy Jews left the ghetto but poorer residents had no choice but to stay (ibid).

In 1931, the community had 1,814 members, and by the end of World War II, 1,050 Jews remained in Venice. During the war, the Jews of Venice were forced back into the ghetto, and the gates and guards returned. Most sources, and this monument, place the number of Jews deported by the nazis from the ghetto during the Holocaust at 246. Notable among these victims was Adolfo Ottolenghi, Chief Rabbi of Venice at the time.

This monument was dedicated by Italian President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro on September 19th, 1993 - the 50th anniversary of the deportation of the Venitian Jews from the ghetto.

Copies of the bronze plaque are displayed:

  • by the Shrine of the Unknown Jewish Martyrs in Paris, France (since 1981);
  • outside the former headquarters of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) at Dag Hammerskjold Plaza in New York in 1982. Paques went into storage when the organization sold its building and were recently donated to the Hebrew Union College; 
  • in the Ninth Fort Museum in Kaunas, Lithuania (since 2003).
Main Surveys & Excavations
Sources

"Arbit Blatas Bas-Reliefs" Jewish Community of Venice Website, http://jvenice.org/en/arbit-blatas-bas-reliefs (accessed March 23, 2023)

McBee, Richard, "Arbit Blatas: Centennial Tribute", https://richardmcbee.com/writings/arbit-blatas-centennial-tribute/ (accessed March 23, 2023)

Romeo, Luisella, "Signs of Remembrance: the Shoah in Venice" BestVeniceGuides.it, https://bestveniceguides.it/en/2019/01/18/signs-of-remembrance-the-shoah-in-venice/? (accessed March 19, 2023)

Sacerdoti, Annie, Guide to Jewish Italy (Brooklyn: Israelowitz Publishing, 1989), 70-71.

"The Last Train - Venezia, Italy," waymarking.com, https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMX0YZ_The_Last_train_Venezia_Italy (accessed April 18, 2023)

"Un monumento alle vittime della Shoah realizzato da Arbit Blatas nel ghetto più antico del mondo" itlietuviai.it, https://www.itlietuviai.it/un-monumento-alle-vittime-della-shoah-realizzato-da-arbit-blatas-nel-ghetto-piu-antico-del-mondo/ (accessed March 23, 2023)
Type
Documenter
Vladimir Levin | 2011
Author of description
Adam Frisch | 2023
Architectural Drawings
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Computer Reconstruction
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Section Head
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Language Editor
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Donor
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Negative/Photo. No.
The following information on this monument will be completed: