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Obj. ID: 9454
Jewish Architecture
  Second Prayer House (Great Hasidic Minyan) in Dagda, Latvia

© Center for Jewish Art, Photographer: Kravtsov, Sergey, 2009

The former Second Prayer House is located on the northern side ofSkolas Street, at the corner ofUpes Street. The plot on its southern side, where before 1941 stood the mitnagdic First Prayer House, became now a forecourt of the building.

The prayer house was designed by N. Gol’iash (?) in the so-called “brick style” in 1896 and built quite similarly to the design. Currently (2009) the building of the former prayer house preserves its basic form and most part of its exterior decoration, notwithstanding that it was split into two floors and slightly heightened.

The building of the Second Prayer House is redbrick, not plastered, coveredwitha hipped roof. Its corners are emphasizedwithwide lesenes. It consisted of the eastern prayer hall and western vestibulewitha women’s section above it. The staircase to the women’s section – shown in the design along the western wall – was never built and women probably accessed the upper floor through an exterior wooden staircase, as it was customary in many other synagogues in the area.

The prayer hall was rectangular, with four segment-headed windows in its eastern wall, and three in each northern and southern ones. The Torah ark was situated by the wide central pier of the eastern wall. The windows of the prayer hall were emphasized on the outside by brickwork decorations. Those on the eastern façade had surroundswithkeystones and side turrets and depressed panels underneath; and those on the southern façade, which originally faced the Mitnagdic Beit Midrash, had sinuous pediments. As could be seen on the interwar photograph, the windows on the northern façade, facing a neighboring plot, were not decorated. After World War II the windows of the eastern façade have been lowered and became rectangular instead of segment-headed; two windows of the southern one were remade into entrances and the third one – into a showcase.

The windows of the vestibule and the women’s section in the western part of the building were segment-headed, as it could be judged from the blocked windows on the northern façade. On the southern façade these windows were completely replaced by wide showcases and the western façade is currently blocked by a later annex. The segment-headed doorway on the northern façade was bricked up in the Soviet period but currently a new door was cut in the same place.

Originally, a dentilled stringcourse encompassed the whole building above the windows and a crowning cornice with fine molding run under the roof. When after World War II the former prayer house was split into two floors and heightened, the original cornice disappeared (currently the building has a new, much simpler cornice). The windows of the upper floor were cut through the stringcourse, thus destroying its meaning of the mezzanine level.

13 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Second Prayer House (Great Hasidic Minyan) in Dagda | Unknown
Object Detail
Date
1896
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Unknown (Unknown)
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Latvia | Latgalia | Dagda
| 6 Skolas St.
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Iconographical Subject
Unknown |
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography

Bogdanova, Rita, Latvija: Sinagogas un rabīni, 1918-1940 / Latvia: Synagogues and Rabbis, 1918-1940 (Riga, 2004)
Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
Zoya Arshavsky, Sergey Kravtsov | 2009
Author of description
Sergey R. Kravtsov, Ilya Lensky, Vladimir Levin | 2012
Architectural Drawings
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Computer Reconstruction
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Section Head
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Language Editor
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Donor
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Negative/Photo. No.