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Obj. ID: 9063
Jewish Architecture
  Great Synagogue in Ozaryntsi, Ukraine

© Sergey Kravtsov, Photographer: Kravtsov, Sergey, 2004

The building is badly damaged.  Nevertheless, a reconstruction could be made from its remaining parts.  These show a two tiered, freestanding building, divided horizontally on its exterior by a moulding, running on all four sides.

The southwest main facade has two central entrances: a door opening to the vestibule and prayer hall in the lower level; and a door leading to the women’s section above the vestibule.  The jutting wooden beams once supported the stairs and gallery, which lead to the upper door.  The stairs must have started on the western corner, resting on the remaining low supporting wall.  The facade is symmetrical.  The two doors, one above the other, constitute a vertical axis flanked by two pairs of windows.

The two side facades, the southeast and northwest, reflect the division of the inner space.  In the upper tier, each is punctuated with a group of four rectangular windows of the prayer hall, and with a separate window of the women’s section.  In the lower tier of the southeast facade, the two rectangular windows of the vestibule are situated.  The northeast wall of the Torah ark has four similar windows in the upper tier.

The upper tier is bordered at the top by a cornice.  Since there are remnants of stones above it, one might conjecture that there had once been a gabled roof.

The building is entered through a door in the southwest facade into a vestibule; another door, placed on the same southwest–northeast axis, leads from the vestibule into a square prayer hall.  Twelve windows are arranged in groups of four in the upper tier of the two side walls, as well as that of the northeast wall, above the central Torah niche.  The women’s section, situated above the vestibule, is separated from the prayer hall by a wall, with two pairs of horizontal slit windows flanking a small, central one, embedded in a niche.  Below the windows and above the door, the remaining four jutting wooden beams suggest that they supported a gallery with stairs leading to it.  The use of this gallery is unknown.

17 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Great Synagogue in Ozaryntsi | Unknown
Object Detail
Monument Setting
Unknown
Date
1800?
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Unknown (Unknown)
Historical Origin
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Iconographical Subject
Unknown |
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
The synagogue was built in the beginning of the 19th century. In the 1920s – 1930s, it was closed by the Soviet authorities. The building was severely damaged, probably during World War II, then continued to deteriorate and was abandoned. A memorial plaque was placed near the main entrance in the mid-1990s by an organization of the former Jewish inhabitants of Ozarintsy (Handros, p. 4)
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography

CJA documentation;

Jewish Cemeteries, Synagogues, and mass grave sites in Ukraine. United States Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad (Washington D.C., 2005);

Beniamin Lukin and Boris Khaimovich, 100 evreiskikh mestechek Ukrainy: istoricheskii putevoditel', issue 1: Podolia (Jerusalem - St. Petersburg, 1997), ill. 13;

http://myshtetl.photohunt.org.ua/ozarincy.html (old and new photo)

Handros, Boris, “Bylo mestechko”, Khadashot (Kiev), 17 April 1992, p. 4.

Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
|
Author of description
Aliza Cohen Mushlin | 2000
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
Aliza Cohen Mushlin | 2000
Language Editor
Judy Cardozo, Sally Oren | 2000
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.