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Obj. ID: 5508
Jewish Architecture
  Yad LeZikharon Synagogue (also known as Small or Burla) in Thessaloniki, Greece

© Samuel D. Gruber, Photographer: Gruber, Samuel D., 2022

Who is Commemorated?

The Jews of Thessaloniki deported and killed in the Holocaust, and the former synagogues of Thessaloniki

Inscriptions

Hebrew:

ק.ק. "יד-לזכרון"
ליהודי תשלוניקי 

Translation: The Holy community "Yad LaZikharon" / to the Jews of Thessaloniki 

Greek:

IEPA ΣYNAΓΩΓH “ΓIANT-ΛEZIKAPON”
ΣΤΗ MNHMH TΩN AΠAXθENTΩN ΑΠΟ ΤΟΥΣ
NAZI EBPAIΩN THΣ θΕΣΣAΛΟΝΙΚΗΣ

Translation: In memory of the Jews of Thessaloniki kidnapped by the Nazis.

Commissioned by

Jewish Community of Thessaloniki


Summary and Remarks

9 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Yad LeZikharon Synagogue (also known as Small, Burla, Market Synagogue or Kahal de la Plasa) in Thessaloniki | Unknown
Object Detail
Monument Setting
Unknown
Date
1984
Synagogue active dates
1984 - to the present
Reconstruction dates
2015 (renovation)
Artist/ Maker
Unknown
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Iconographical Subject
Unknown |
Textual Content
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
Material/Technique
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
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Measurements
Height
Length
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Weight
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Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Synagogue
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
B (Fair)
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
2 (Regional)
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
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Colophon
Scribal Notes
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Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance

The synagogue is dedicated to the memory of Holocaust victims. It is located in a large new building opened in 1984 that also houses the offices of the Jewish Community of Thessaloniki. This building replaced a previous synagogue that belonged to the Bourla family that was destroyed in an earthquake in 1978. The Bourla family gave the synagogue to the community after World War II. In the new synagogue, the hechal (Ark) comes from the former Kal Sarfati, the French synagogue, and the tevah originates from the Baron Hirsch Synagogue, named for the Jewish philanthropist.

In 2015, the Jewish Community of Thessaloniki, under the leadership of President David Saltiel, sponsored the renovation of the synagogue for better liturgical functioning, to repair and replace electromechanical equipment for energy efficiency, and to highlight the historic elements of the sanctuary. The project was carried out by an architectural team of Dr. Elias Messinas with KARD Architects (Dimitris Raidis and Alexandros Kouloukouri). 

A large commemorative plaque is set in the lobby wall of the community building close to the entrance to the synagogue. Inside the synagogue sanctuary, one side wall contains six tall and narrow inscriptions that record the names (12 per inscription), of more than 70 of the synagogues known to have existed in Thessaloniki, including those from before the great fire of 1917, and those in use during the interwar years of the 1920s and 1930s. According to published sources, more synagogues existed in Thessaloniki, especially prior to the great fire of 1917, where archival and published sources indicate to 32 synagogues, 17 communal and 65 private prayer halls (midrashim).This memorial list was included in the sanctuary renovation of 2017 and is based on the lists and descriptions of former synagogues compiled by architect Dr. Elias Messinas in his book The Synagogues of Greece: A Study of Synagogues in Macedonia and Thrace (2011) and second edition (2022).

Inside the synagogue sanctuary, one side wall contains six tall and narrow inscriptions that record the names (12 per inscription), of all the synagogues known to have existed in Thessaloniki, including those from before the great fire of 1917, and those in use during the interwar years of the 1920s and 1930s. This memorial list was included in the sanctuary renovation of 20?? and is based on the lists and descriptions of former synagogue compiled by architect Elias Messinas in his book The Synagogues of Greece: A Study of Synagogues in Macedonia and Thrace (2012).


Main Surveys & Excavations
Sources

Dorfman, Rivka and Ben-Zion. Synagogues without Jews and the Communities that Built and Used Them (Philadelphia: The Jewish Publication Society of America, 2000), p. 330.

Glassman, Les, "Yad La Zikharon Synagogue Thessaloniki," Youtube, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPJqrDUEg-I (accessed November 2, 2022)

"Heritage and Heritage Sites in Greece," Jewish Heritage Europe, http://www.jewish-heritage-europe.eu/greece/heritage-and-heritage-sites (accessed November 2, 2022)

Messinas, Elias. The Synagogues of Greece: A Study of Synagogues in Macedonia and Thrace (Jacksonville: Bloch Publishing Company in association with Bowman & Cody Academic Publishing, 2012)., https://issuu.com/eliasblue/docs/messinas_synagogues_of_greece_do_no (accessed December 1, 2021)

Stavroulakis , Nicholas P. and Timothy J. DeVinney. Jewish Sites and Synagogues of Greece (Athens, 1992)
Type
Documenter
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Author of description
Samuel D. Gruber | 2022
Architectural Drawings
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Computer Reconstruction
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Language Editor
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Negative/Photo. No.
The following information on this monument will be completed:
Unknown |