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Obj. ID: 52093
Memorials
  Marker at the Destroyed Jewish Cemetery in the Aventine Hill Rose Garden in Rome, Italy, 1950(?)

© Samuel Gruber, Photographer: Gruber, Samuel D., 2023

Memorial Name

No official name

Who is Commemorated?

The destroyed Jewish Cemetery

Description

Just inside the gated entrance to the Rose Garden, to the left, is a small raised paved area that supports a trellised pavilion with a pyramidal roof. At one corner is a free-standing marker; a roughly trapezoidal concrete pier with a flat top that is slightly broader than the rest of the monument. Attach midway up the face of the pier, set off-center, is a white marble (?) plaque, in the shape of the Tablets of the Law, upon which are inscribed in Hebrew the first words of the Ten Commandments. There is no other text.

Part of the garden has been laid out in a pattern that resembles the shape of a menorah. This appears to have been an intentional commemorative design.

It is presumed the remains of many – perhaps thousands – of Jews remain buried on the site and thus by Jewish law, the Rose Garden is treated as a sacred space, still a cemetery. Visitors have placed memorial stones on the top of the marker.

Inscriptions

Tablet Plaque Right Column (Hebrew)

אנכִי ייה
לא יהיה
לא תשא
זכור את יום
כבד את

 Tablet Plaque Left Column (Hebrew)

לא תרצח
לא תנאף
לא תגנב
לא תענה
לא תחמ'

Translation: [the ten commandments]

Commissioned by

[to be determined]

Summary and Remarks
Remarks

12 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Marker at the Destroyed Jewish Cemetery in the Aventine Hill Rose Garden | Unknown
Object Detail
Monument Setting
Public park
Cemetery
{"9":"Any memorial erected or installed in a present-day public park, including Jewish cemeteries or other sites now operated as public space."}
Date
1950 (or shortly thereafter)
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Origin
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Unknown |
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Italy | Lazio | Rome
| Roseto di Roma Via di Valle Murcia, 6, 00153 Roma
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Iconographical Subject
Textual Content
Languages of inscription
Shape / Form
Material / Technique
Concrete
Stone (possibly marble)
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
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Depth
Circumference
Thickness
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Weight
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Panel Measurements
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance

The monument marks the site of a Jewish cemetery in Rome destroyed in 1936.

Remains of a medieval cemetery were discovered and excavated in Trastevere (Rome) in 2017. This had been destroyed in the first half of the 17th century (certainly by 1645) when Pope Urban VIII Barberini expanded the city walls and disrupted the area.  At that time, a new plot on the Aventine Hill was given to the Jews and this was in use until it was destroyed for a new road, The Via Del Circo Massimo. along the edge of the Aventine above the Circus Maximus, all part of Mussolini's creation of his Third Rome.

Today the city's famous Roseto Comunale (Rose Garden) occupies the site. Not all the remains were removed when it was closed. The marker at the entrance to the Rose Garden acknowledges the Jewish history of the site.

 

The destruction of the cemetery set the stage for the destruction of the Jewish cemeteries elsewhere. Just a few years later in 1938, Fascist officials in Italian-controlled Rhodes destroyed the cemetery there. Then, there was even bigger destruction in German-occupied Thessaloniki, where the massive cemetery was quickly destroyed at the urging of local officials who saw its vast space as an obstruction to urban growth. Aristotle University was subsequently built on the site. 

Main Surveys & Excavations
Sources

David, Ariel. “Sub Rosa: A Rome Garden With a Secret Jewish Past,” Haaretz, June 11, 2014, https://www.haaretz.com/jewish/2014-06-11/ty-article/romes-secret-jewish-garden/0000017f-db14-db22-a17f-ffb5bc7f0000 (accessed September 20, 2023)

Kleinlehrer, D. “Many Hearts Ache As Rome Excavates an Ancient Cemetery,” Jewish Daily Bulletin, August 20, 1934, http://pdfs.jta.org/1934/1934-08-20_2928.pdf (accessed September 20, 2023)

Tercatin, Rossella, “The not-so-rosy history of Rome’s public Rose Garden,” Times of Israel, May 20, 2016
Type
Documenter
Samuel Gruber | 2023
Author of description
Samuel Gruber | 2023
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
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Section Head
|
Language Editor
Adam Frisch | 2023
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.
The following information on this monument will be completed: