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Obj. ID: 52091
Memorials
  Child Victims of the Holocaust Monument in the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, France, 2017

© Samuel Gruber, Photographer: Gruber, Samuel D., 2018

Memorial Name

Jewish Children’s Memorial Monument

Who is Commemorated?

Jewish children deported from France between 1942 and 1944

Description

The monument is in section 97 of the cemetery in an area of other collective monuments. It consists of a large concrete platform set into a low grassy hill. The cemetery wall is immediately to the left. A monument to the victims of Auschwitz III (Buna-Monowitz) is to the right.  

Metal rods are set into the concrete, and these are twisted to create the silhouettes of seventeen children. Taller children are in the back and smaller ones are up front. The figures are just outlines and are transparent, so the effect is of a group of ghosts.  On the edge of the platform, bronze letters are affixed with a short dedicatory inscription. Six-pointed stars are set at each end of the inscription, near the corners of the platform.  

Inscription

On the Base (French)

1942  A La mémoire des enfants juifs assassinés par les Nazis  1945
Passant ta mémoire est leu seule sépulture

Translation: In memory of the Jewish children murdered by the Nazis / Your passing on their memory is their only burial

Commissioned by

Conseil national pour la mémoire des enfants juifs déportés (COMEJD) [National Council for the Memory of Deported Jewish Children] and the City of Paris 

Summary and Remarks
Remarks

6 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Jewish Children’s Memorial Monument | Unknown
Object Detail
Monument Setting
Date
2017
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Origin
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Unknown |
Congregation
Unknown
Location
France | Ile-de-France région | Paris
| Père Lachaise Cemetery
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Iconographical Subject
Textual Content
Languages of inscription
Shape / Form
Material / Technique
Concrete
Stainless Steel
Bronze
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
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Length
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Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance

In September 2001 the Council of Paris decided to pay special tribute to the 11,400 Jewish children in Parisian schools who were deported to their deaths. By 2017, after extensive research, 6,890 children were remembered by name on 391 commemorative separate plaques placed on 384 schools throughout Paris. Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo promised when previously unveiling a plaque at the same site, that a central monument would be created in memory of all the 11,450 children deported from France, including 6,100 from Paris alone.

There was a call for projects, and a jury chaired by Ivan Levaï selected Casto Solano's design which was praised for its originality and the emotions it evokes. On October 14, 2017, Mayor Hidalgo inaugurated a monument. In her remarks, she referred specifically to the September 2017 attack on a Jewish family in the neighboring town of Seine-Saint-Denis, and the murder of Sarah Halimi in April 2017, at her home in the 20th arrondissement, as evidence that antisemitism and anti-Jewish violence has not ended.

Main Surveys & Excavations
Sources

'Monument aux enfants juifs assassinés par les nazis," Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Amis et Passionnés du Père Lachaise (APPL), https://www.appl-lachaise.net/monument-aux-enfants-juifs-assassines-par-les-nazis/ (accessed February 21, 2024)

Bassit, Rina, “Holocaust Memorial for Children Dedicated in Paris,” Jerusalem Post, October 14, 2017, https://www.jpost.com/diaspora/holocaust-memorial-for-children-dedicated-in-paris-507413 (accessed August 26, 2022)

“Anne Hidalgo inaugure un monument à la mémoire des enfants juifs déportés,” Press release (Paris Press), https://presse.paris.fr/pages/13700 (accessed September 20, 2023)

“Le monument aux enfants parisiens victimes de la Shoah,” Amejd12.net, https://amejd12.net/2017/10/15/le-monument-aux-enfants-parisiens-victimes-de-la-shoah/ (accessed September 20, 2023)
Type
Documenter
Samuel Gruber | 2023
Author of description
Samuel Gruber | 2023
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
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Section Head
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Language Editor
Adam Frisch | 2023
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.
The following information on this monument will be completed: