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Obj. ID: 4067
Sacred and Ritual Objects
  Torah shield donated by Zelke von Lämel, Nuremberg (Nürnberg), 1763

© Center for Jewish Art, Photographer: Radovan, Zev, 4.1994

The arched-shaped Torah shield comprises a plate, movable plaques, and three medallions. 
On both sides of the plate are two twisted columns supported by round bases, carrying lambs (fig. 1). A central rectangular frame encloses indicatory plaques. A protruding crown is set on top, over an inscribed cartouche with a Hebrew dedicatory inscription. The inscription continues on the three medallions, suspended from the plate:

"לעמיל/ ב"ה (בן הרב) זעליגמן/ ז"ל (זכרו לברכה) מטושקו/ וזוגתו/ מ' (מרת) רבקה תי' (שתחיה)/ מפראג // בשנת תקכ"ג/ נעשה/ לפ"ק"

"Lämel (a lamb in Yiddish), son of Rabbi Zeligmann, of blessed memory, from Toschco and his wife Mrs. Rebecca, may she live, from Prague. (It was) done in the year (5)523 (1763)" 
On the round bases are two additional inscriptions, added later with the columns, revealing the story of the object and the family (fig. 2):

"אלה הם כלי הקודש אשר נדבה רוח/ אבותי ז"ל (זכרם לברכה) לעשותם ואשר התחדשו/ על ידי בנם הנקרא מלפנים זעלקע/ טושקו ועל ידי חסד אדונינו/ הקיסר פראנץ הראשון נקראתי/ בשם עדלאר פאן לעמל/ תקפ"ו לפ"ק // 
גם בזאת הטה אדונינו/ הקיסר יר"ה (ירום הודו) חסדו וטובו/ עלי ועל זרעי אחרי ליתן לנו/ רשות לפתח פתוחי וחותם כאחד/ השרים ונגידי ארץ כדמות/ אשר לפניך: שנת וכל מעשה תקפ"ו (אסתר י:ב) / לפ"ק"

“These are the sacred implements that have been donated by my ancestors, of blessed memory. And (the objects) were renovated by their son, who was formerly called Zelke Toschco, and by the mercy of our Lord, Emperor Franz I, who gave me the title of the nobleman of Lämel (Edler von Lämel) the year (5)586 (1826).

And our Lord the Emperor honoured me and my offspring, allowing me to have an engraved armorial device, as one of the honourable noblemen in the form of (the device) before you. In the year 'And all the acts' (of his power and of his might, and the declaration of the greatness of Mordechai, whereunto the king advanced him… Esth. 8:2; (5)586 (1826)."

The family emblem of Edler von Lämel is engraved on the bottom of each inscription, depicting a rectangular shield divided into two registers, enclosing an eagle over a lamb. A crest of a two-winged helmet is set over the shield, enclosing a star.  

38 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Torah shield donated by Zelke von Lämel | Unknown
Object Detail
Date
1763 (inscription), 1826 (inscription)
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Unknown (Unknown)
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Location
Unknown |
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period Detail
Collection
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Silver, gilded
Structure: hammered, cut
Decoration: chased, cast, engraved
Bonding: soldered, screwed
Inscription: engraved
Material Stucture
hammered, cut
Material Decoration
chased, cast, engraved
Material Bonding
soldered, screwed
Material Inscription
engraved
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
350 mm
Length
Width
290 mm
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Condition
Intact.
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
There are three Hallmarks on the object:1. The hallmark depicts an animal (duck) in a shield. This is an unidentified hallmark. 2. The combined letters T and F in a round frame. This is an Austro Hungarian tax mark for small items used 1810-1824. cf.
Divis, p.95 #560. 3. The letter N in a round frame, this is the city mark for Nuremberg used 1700-1750. cf.Divis, p.79 #400 .
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
Zelke (known as Simon; 1776 - 1845) who renovated the shield and re-donated it to the synagogue was born in Toschco, a town in Bohemia, under Austrian rule. As customary at the time, he was named Toschco, after his place of origin. Toschco was a wool merchant dealing with the wool industry in Bohemia and Austria. During the war against Napoleon Bonaparte (December 1805), he assisted the Austrian Royal Treasury and contributed money to fund the war. In gratitude for his act, he was honored by the Emperor and was awarded the title of nobility: Edler von Lämel (in German), and which permitted him to possess a family coat of arms, as stated in the dedicatory inscription. The title Lämel refers to his father's name, who probably was also dealing with wool. In 1856, Eliza Hertz, the daughter of the Edler von Lämel contributed money to build a school in Jerusalem, to educate Jewish orphans according to a new German innovative schooling system. She named the school Lämel, after her father's name. Ludwig August Frankal-Hochwart, was appointed, on behalf of Eliza, to supervise the curriculum and to direct the school, when time comes. Like her father, Frankal was also honoured by the Emperor, Franz the 1st and was awarded a knighthood title of Ritter von Frankal, for the publication of a patriotic book of poems: "The Poem of the Hubsburg Family." The building was designed by the German Architect Theodor Sandler. He was probably acquainted with the clock which adorns the Alt-neu synagogue in Prague, and he decorated the school façade with a similar clock, with Hebrew letters, instead of ciphers. The school was the first to teach different subjects in Hebrew and was considered by the Ashkenazi highly orthodox community in Jerusalem as a school of the Enlightenment movement. Thus, they opposed any of its activities and acted against it. However, the school gained the support of the Sephardi community in Jerusalem and till the 1880's, Ladino (Judeo Spanish) was considered its first language. During the British Mandate, the school became a public school and today it is a Talmud Torah, used by the Orthodox Jewish population.
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
According to the Museum card, the shield was in use in the Maisels synagogue in Prague. It reached the Jewish Museum of Prague during WWII and was recorded then by Dr. K. and Dr. E.
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography

Friedlander, Mordechai, Zvi. Shir Mizmor Likhvod ha-keisar (a hymn for the Emperor Franz Song). Vienna: Friedrich Forester, 1860. In Hebrew.

Kroyanker, David. Jerusalem Architecture – Periods and Styles, Jewish Neighborhoods and Public Buildings Outside the City Walls. Israel: Keter Publishing House, 1991. In Hebrew.

Reitzner, Viktor. Alt Wein Lexikon fur Osterr u. Suddeutsches Kunstgewerbe, Wien, 1952. 

Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
Michael Tal | 03. 93
Author of description
Ariella Amar | 06. 97
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
Ariella Amar | 06. 07
Language Editor
Judith Cardozo | 07.07
Donor
UNESCO |
Negative/Photo. No.