Home
    Under Reconstruction!
Object Alone

Obj. ID: 38803
Jewish printed books
  Ben Tzion by Yosef ben Elimelech of Turobin, Amsterdam, 1690

© Gross Family Collection, Photographer: Unknown,

This text was prepared by William Gross:

Ben Tzion, prayers and kabbalah, piyyutim and poems, by R. Yosef son of R. Elimelech of Turobin. Amsterdam: R. Moshe son of Avraham Avinu, [1690]. Illustrated title page with ornamental borders and figures. Includes the text of LeShem Yichud for many mitzvot, examples of flowery introductory sentences to letters, and plays consisting of dialogs between the Good inclination and the Evil inclination. The title on p. 2, "Approbations of the three shepherds, prominent Torah scholars… of the Sephardi and Ashkenazi communities in Amsterdam", is followed by an approbation signed by one signatory only, R. Moshe Yehuda son of R. Kalonymus HaKohen, rabbi of the Ashkenazi community in Amsterdam. He describes the author: "The elderly Torah scholar, R. Yosef son of R. Elimelech, resident of Poland, from the community of Turobin"
A multi-subject work encompassing ethics, Kabbalah, mnemonic terms for the mitzvot, chiromancy, benedictions, formulaic headings for letters, and other subjects, by R. Joseph ben Elimelech of Torbin, Poland (17th C). This is the only edition of Ben Zion.
Title page with two winged cherubim at top, and a large cartouche below framing the printer’s information and date. Folio 24b contains a depiction of a hand, in conjunction with the entry on palmistry.
Little is known of Joseph b. Elimelech of Torbin, aside from that he was a Talmudic scholar from Poland. Ben Zion is his only known work.
Moses ben Avraham Avinu printed briefly in Amsterdam in 1690 and again in 1692, and represents a colorful chapter in Hebrew printing. A proselyte to Judaism, he was born in Haase and is referred to as Moses Polak in Dutch records. Originally from Nikolsburg or Prague, Moses came to Amsterdam, together with his wife Friede Israels, already a practicing Jew or a convert to Judaism in Amsterdam. There, Moses worked as a compositor in the printing-presses of Uri Phoebus Ha-Levi and David Tartas. In 1689 Moses ben Avraham acquired the printing house of Moses Kosman, but not his type foundry; he also acquired type cut by Hermanus Mandelslo. While eight titles are attributed to his press in 1690, he was not successful in this venture, and, in November 1690, deeply in debt, his printing house failed.
The failure of Moses’ press has been attributed to a suit brought against him by Tartas over the right to print a Polish-rite prayer book. Although he won the suit, he no longer had the resources to continue printing. In 1694, however, he resumed printing, again with a Polish-rite prayer book, and again against Tartas’ opposition. In the end, he only printed four books (not the prayer book), and again did not succeed in the printing business. He left Amsterdam for Germany with unpaid debts, and continued to work in printing houses in Berlin, Frakfurt am Oder, and finally Halle. He eventually began printing independently, and put out the prayer book Tefilah-le-Moshe, which contained the prayer Aleinu, recently prohibited by royal decree. As a result, the press was closed, the typographical material and equipment seized, and Moses ben Avraham Avinu incarcerated.
Ben Tzion is the only volume in the Gross Family Collection from this printer.

1 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Ben Tzion by Yosef ben Elimelech of Turobin | Unknown
Object Detail
Date
1690
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Moses ben Avraham Avinu, Printing House in Amsterdam (1689-1716) and Halle
(Unknown)
Moses ben Avraham Avinu printed briefly in Amsterdam in 1690 and again in 1692, and represents a colorful chapter in Hebrew printing. A proselyte to Judaism, he was born in Haase and is referred to as Moses Polak in Dutch records. Originally from Nikolsburg or Prague, Moses came to Amsterdam, together with his wife Friede Israels, already a practicing Jew or a convert to Judaism in Amsterdam. There, Moses worked as a compositor in the printing-presses of Uri Phoebus Ha-Levi and David Tartas. In 1689 Moses ben Avraham acquired the printing house of Moses Kosman, but not his type foundry; he also acquired type cut by Hermanus Mandelslo. While eight titles are attributed to his press in 1690, he was not successful in this venture, and, in November 1690, deeply in debt, his printing house failed.The failure of Moses’ press has been attributed to a suit brought against him by Tartas over the right to print a Polish-rite prayer book. Although he won the suit, he no longer had the resources to continue printing. In 1694, however, he resumed printing, again with a Polish-rite prayer book, and again against Tartas’ opposition. In the end, he only printed four books (not the prayer book), and again did not succeed in the printing business. He left Amsterdam for Germany with unpaid debts, and continued to work in printing houses in Berlin, Frakfurt am Oder, and finally Halle. He eventually began printing independently, and put out the prayer book Tefilah-le-Moshe, which contained the prayer Aleinu, recently prohibited by royal decree. As a result, the press was closed, the typographical material and equipment seized, and Moses ben Avraham Avinu incarcerated.
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Unknown |
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Unknown |
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Paper, Ink, Letterpress, Woodcut
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
15.3 cm
Length
Width
9.8 cm
Depth
0.7 cm
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography
Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
|
Author of description
|
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
|
Language Editor
|
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.