Home
    Under Reconstruction!
Object Alone

Obj. ID: 38053
Jewish printed books
  Masais Binyamin ha-Shlishi by Mendele Moicher Seforim, Moscow, 1948

© Gross Family Collection, Photographer: Unknown,

This text was prepared by William Gross:

The Travels of Benjamin the Third (מסעות בנימין השלישי, Masa'ot Binyamin Ha-Shelishi) is a Hebrew satirical work from the writer Mendele Mocher Sforim. The work was published first in the year 1878 in Yiddish, and, from then, until today, it has been considered by some to be the greatest satire on Jewish life in the Diaspora.
The story tells of the travels of Benjamin the Third along with his assistant and partner Sandril. The two travel far and wide to find the "Red Jews" beyond the Sambatyon. Benjamin III and Sandriel are based on the characters of Don Quixote and his famous assistant Sancho Panza. Benjamin III himself is a historical continuation of the two previous "Benjamins" who were known for their travels - Benjamin of Tudela and Benjamin II. The work has also inspired a number of plays, the first of which was presented in the 1930s on the stages of the Ohel and Habima theaters.
The book's author, Mendele Mocher Sforim (lit. "Mendele the book peddler), was born Sholem Yankev Abramovich in Kapyl on January 2, 1836. He was a Jewish author and one of the founders of modern Yiddish and Hebrew literature.
Mendele was born to a poor family. His father, Chaim Moyshe Broyde, died shortly after Mendele became Bar Mitzvah. He studied in yeshiva in Slutsk and Vilna until he was 17; during this time he was a day-boarder under the system of Teg-Essen, barely scraping by, and often hungry. Mendele next traveled extensively around Belarus, Ukraine and Lithuania at the mercy of an abusive beggar named Avreml Khromoy. In 1854, he settled in Kamianets-Podilskyi, where he got to know writer and poet Avrom Ber Gotlober, who helped him to understand secular culture, philosophy, literature, history, Russian and other languages.
Mendele initially wrote in Hebrew, coining many words in that language, but ultimately switched to Yiddish in order to expand his audience. As did Sholem Aleichem, he used a pseudonym because of the perception at the time that as a ghetto vernacular, Yiddish was not suited to serious literary work — an idea he did much to dispel. His writing strongly bore the mark of the Haskalah. He is considered by many to be the "grandfather of Yiddish literature," a name applied by Aleichem in the dedication to his novel Stempenyu; his style in both Hebrew and Yiddish has strongly influenced several generations of later writers.

4 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Masais Binyamin ha-Shlishi by Mendele Moicher Seforim | Unknown
Object Detail
Date
1948
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Unknown |
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Unknown |
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Paper, Ink
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
16.7 cm
Length
Width
13 cm
Depth
1 cm
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Iconographical Subject
Unknown |
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography
Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
|
Author of description
|
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
|
Language Editor
|
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.