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© Center for Jewish Art, Photographer: Dashevskii, D., 1990
Name/Title
Kloyz of R. David Moshe Friedmann in Chortkiv | Unknown
Object
Object Detail
Settings
Unknown
Date
1881-1885
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Brick plastered walls, wooden roof constructions.
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
15.75 m
Length
Width
45.25 m
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Subject
Unknown |
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
West
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
East
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
West
Direction Prayer
East
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program

According to witnesses' testimony, four animals (Mishna Avot 5:20) were depicted on the ceiling of the vestibule. The ceiling of the prayer hall was decorated with "beautiful decorations" (Sefer Chortkov, p. 70) (see Description of the interior above).

Summary and Remarks

The Kloyz building was probably inspirited by the Kloyz in Sadgora, the residence of Rabbi David Moshe's father, Rabbi Israel of Ruzhin, and his elder brother, R. Avraham Yaakov.

The Tsaddiks of Ruzhin-Sadgora dynasty did not pray with their Hassidim, but had a separate prayer room near the main prayer hall.  This arrangement was started by R. Israel of Ruzhin and is noteworthy in all Kloyzn of his descendants (Asaf, pp. 372-3, Even, pp. 3, 83, 153).

Since the women did not take part in the Hassidic rituals at all and especially in the "pilgrimages" to the Tsaddiks on Saturdays and Holydays, the women's section of the Kloyz, if it existed, served only women living in the court, i.e. the family members and servants.

Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
Rabbi David Moshe Friedman of Chortkov (1827-1903), the fifth son of Rabbi Israel of Ruzhin established his court in Chortkov after the year 1869 (Asaf, p. 463). The dwelling palace was probably bought from the princess Jeronima Borkowska in 1865 (Sefer Chortkov, p. 31; Asaf, p. 370, n. 17). Therefore, the Kloyz was built after that date. According to the Hassidic tradition, the Kloyz was planned by R. David Moshe's son, Rabbi Israel (Asaf, p. 370). Although the court of the Chortkover Rebbe had no influence in the Jewish community of Chortkov (Asaf, p. 366, n. 9; Sefer Chortkov, p. 69), it was an important factor in the economic life of the town, since thousands of Hassidim arrived to see the Rebbe, especially during the Holydays, and also served as an attraction to inhabitants, especially the large park (Sefer Chortkov, p. 70). After R. Moshe David's death, the Kloyz served his son and successor, Rabbi Israel (1854-1934). In 1914, with the start of the First World War, he fled to Vienna, where he lived until his death. However, he used to visit Chortkov during the Holydays (Sefer Chortkov, pp. 57, 61-2). After the Second World War the building was used by an engineering-building military unit. Part of the roof constructions were removed for use as building material, which caused the beginning of the ceiling's collapse. To prevent the collapse, four octagonal columns were inserted into the prayer hall. In the 1980s, the building was remodeled for the Centre of Youth Art.
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography
Alfasi, Itshak, Hahasidut midor ledor, vol. 1 (Jerusalem, 1995), pp. 61-67; Asaf, David, Derekh hamalkhut: r. Israel miruzhin umekomo betoldot hahasidut (Jerusalem, 1997), pp. 367-373; Austri-Dunn, Yeshayahu (ed.), Sefer yizkor lehantzhat kdoshei kehilat chortkov (Haifa-Tel Aviv, 1967); Even Itzhak, Funem rebens hoif: zikhroines un maises (New York, 1922; reprint: Israel, 1970).
Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
Z. Lagush, Z. Horbach |
Researcher
Vladimir Levin | 2001, 2016
Architectural Drawings
Z. Lagush, Z. Horbach |
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
A. Cohen-Mushlin | 2001
Language Editor
J. Cardoso, S. Oren | 2001
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.
A163761