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© Center for Jewish Art, Photographer: Radovan, Zev, 1994
The synagogue building is a square basilica, oriented from north-west to south-east, composed of a central nave flanked by three oblong aisles. The aisles are separated by three rows of pillars, one aisle to the west of the nave and two to its east. The entrance to the synagogue was through three openings situated in the northern wall. The floor was paved with mosaics. An additional hall is attached to the basilica at the southeast. The hall is divided into four small rooms. The second room from the west had an opening to the nave from which steps led to this room. According to the archeological finds the date of the synagogue is at the begining of the fourth century C.E.
Name/Title
Hammath Tiberias Synagogue | Unknown
Object
Object Detail
Settings
Unknown
Date
286-337 CE
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Unknown (Unknown)
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Unknown |
Congregation
Unknown
Location
School/Style
Unknown|
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Stone
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
150cm.
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Subject
Unknown |
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
The remains of Hammath-Tiberias extend from the hot springs to the southern boundary of ancient Tiberias. The Bible and the Talmud mention Hammath as one of the fortified cities of Naftali (Joshua 19:35, B.T. Megillah 1,70) and as one of the Levites' cities (Joshua 21:32, Chronicles I, 6:61). Hammath is mentioned several times in the Mishna and in the Talmud. According to R. Johanan the place was called Hammath after the hot springs (Hamme) of Tiberias (B.T. Megillah 6a). Tiberias and Hammath were originally two separate cities each surrounded by its own wall (B.T. Megillah 2b) but they were subsequently united into one city, apparently in the first century C.E. (Tosefta Erubin 7:2). R. Meir used to preach in the synagogue of Hammath every Saturday night (P.T. Sota,1:4). When Tiberias became a spiritual center and the seat of the Sanhedrin in the third century C.E., the suburb of Hammath shared its prominence. With the abolition of the Patriarchate in C.E. 429, Hammath began to decline, but it continued to exist as a city relying on its hot springs. The Jewish community remained in the city throughout the Arab period until its decline in the Middle Ages. Two excavations were carried out at the site. The first was under the direction of N. Slouschz on behalf of the Palestine Exploration Society and the Department of Antiquities (1921). The second excavation was undertaken under the direction of M. Dothan on behalf of the Israel Department of Antiquities (1961-1963). In the excavation four layers were discovered. In the two upper layers four superimposed synagogues were found. The construction of the synagogue went through four phases (layers IIa-b, Ia-b), beginning in the fourth century and ending in the middle of the eight century C.E.
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography
Dothan, M., 1983, pp.27-31. Dothan, M., 1978, pp.1180-1184.
Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Original
Documenter
| G.W. 1993, N.S. 9.1994, D.D. & T.N. 10.1994.
Researcher
|
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
|
Language Editor
|
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.
084013