Home
    Under Reconstruction!
Art Alone
© Center for Jewish Art, Photographer: Unknown,

Fig. 1: The qualities of Christ and of his enemies       Fig. 2: The qualities of Christ and of his enemies

Former front or back woodcut flyleaf                          S. Fridolin, Schatzbehalter der wahren Reichtümer

Munich Ashkenzi Siddur-Mahzor                                des Heils, fig. 66

olim BSB Cod.hebr. 69                                              Nurmberg, 1491

(Munich, SGS Inv. No. 171526)                                   Munich, BSB Rar. 293, fol. 124r-124v

 

Both front and back woodcuts once formed part of the pastedown bifolia, only their stubs remaining. Remnants of green colour are seen on the recto of the first paper flyleaf of the back cover, indicating that the coloured woodcut was inserted between the last parchment leaf and the two paper flyleaves.

The former front or back flyleaf was removed on 1st December 1862 and is currently in SGS, Inv. No. 171526. It appears in the text of the Schatzbehalter as fig.66 (BSB, Rar. 293, fol. 124r-124v). It depicts Christ in the centre of a hilly landscape, between trees, blessing with his right hand and holding a stick in his left. His haloed head is surrounded by five animals: an elephant, a turtle dove, a lamb, a pelican and a phoenix. A few black birds attack these animals, while the wild animals, wolf (or dog), bear, lion, unicorn, wild boar and a fox at Jesus’ feet tear at his clothes. On the left, between the trees is a female figure with a sheep and on the right is a flock of sheep on a hill (Bellm 1962, 29-30).

Name/Title
WoodcuSchatzbehaltert from | Unknown
Object
Object Detail
Former flyleaf woodcut in BSB Cod.hebr. 69, originally printed in Schatzbehalter der wahren Reichtümer des Heils by S. Fridolin
Settings
Unknown
Date
1491
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Unknown (Unknown)
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Site
Unknown
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique

Both front and back woodcuts once formed part of the pastedown bifolia, only their stubs remaining. Remnants of green colour are seen on the recto of the first paper flyleaf of the back cover, indicating that the coloured woodcut was inserted between the last parchment leaf and the two paper flyleaves.


The former front or back flyleaf was removed on 1st December 1862 and is currently in SGS, Inv. No. 171526. It appears in the text of the Schatzbehalter as fig.66 (BSB, Rar. 293, fol. 124r-124v). It depicts Christ in the centre of a hilly landscape, between trees, blessing with his right hand and holding a stick in his left. His haloed head is surrounded by five animals: an elephant, a turtle dove, a lamb, a pelican and a phoenix. A few black birds attack these animals, while the wild animals, wolf (or dog), bear, lion, unicorn, wild boar and a fox at Jesus’ feet tear at his clothes. On the left, between the trees is a female figure with a sheep and on the right is a flock of sheep on a hill (Bellm 1962, 29-30).

Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Inner frame: 248 x 175 mm.
With frame: 314 x 256 mm. (the frame is slightly cropped)
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks

The text clarifying this image in the Schatzbehalter (BSB, Rar. 293, fol. 124r-124v) is entitled Von der Sucht der Sitten Cristi (In search of Christ’s qualities) and belongs to the 61st-65th responses (Gegenwürfe) dealing with Christ’s qualities and those of his enemies, particularly the Jews. It represents an allegory of the virtues of Christ, opposed to the vices of the Jews. In the text Fridolin explains that the birds and other creatures surrounding Christ’s head are his five qualities: the elephant for Christ’s courage, the turtle dove for his virginity, the lamb for his good heart and gentleness, the pelican for his faithfulness, and the phoenix for his resurrection, in the longstanding Christian tradition. By contrast, the wild animals depicted at Christ’s feet stand for the Jewish priests and other enemies who persecuted him. The Jews are described by Fridolin as jealous dogs, dishonest as foxes, lustful as bears, greedy and cruel like wolves, wild and unclean like pigs, proud as the lion and haughty as a unicorn. He adds that they are mocking like a magpie, impure like a passerine, dirty like the hoopoe, thievish like ravens, faithless like an ostrich, merciless like the owl and blind like bats. The attacking black birds and the owl on the right relate to this description. They do not appear in Capestrano's panel and were added by the Schatzbehalter’s artists to make an acute comparison.

The female figure on the left with a sheep at her feet, as Fridolin indicates, alludes to the parable of the Lost Sheep (Mt 18:12-14; Lk 15:3-7), namely the lost sinner. The Lord left ninety-nine sheep on a hill in search for the lost hundredth one, which caused more joy in heaven over a repentant soul than over ninety-nine just souls (PL 76:1247: Gregorius I Magnus, Homiliarum in Evangelia, II/XXXIV, Sunday Sermons III, trans. Toal 1959, 201-202).    

Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography

The text clarifying this image in the Schatzbehalter (BSB, Rar. 293, fol. 124r-124v) is entitled Von der Sucht der Sitten Cristi (In search of Christ’s qualities) and belongs to the 61st-65th responses (Gegenwürfe) dealing with Christ’s qualities and those of his enemies, particularly the Jews. It represents an allegory of the virtues of Christ, opposed to the vices of the Jews. In the text Fridolin explains that the birds and other creatures surrounding Christ’s head are his five qualities: the elephant for Christ’s courage, the turtle dove for his virginity, the lamb for his good heart and gentleness, the pelican for his faithfulness, and the phoenix for his resurrection, in the longstanding Christian tradition. By contrast, the wild animals depicted at Christ’s feet stand for the Jewish priests and other enemies who persecuted him. The Jews are described by Fridolin as jealous dogs, dishonest as foxes, lustful as bears, greedy and cruel like wolves, wild and unclean like pigs, proud as the lion and haughty as a unicorn. He adds that they are mocking like a magpie, impure like a passerine, dirty like the hoopoe, thievish like ravens, faithless like an ostrich, merciless like the owl and blind like bats. The attacking black birds and the owl on the right relate to this description. They do not appear in Capestrano's panel and were added by the Schatzbehalter’s artists to make an acute comparison.

The female figure on the left with a sheep at her feet, as Fridolin indicates, alludes to the parable of the Lost Sheep (Mt 18:12-14; Lk 15:3-7), namely the lost sinner. The Lord left ninety-nine sheep on a hill in search for the lost hundredth one, which caused more joy in heaven over a repentant soul than over ninety-nine just souls (PL 76:1247: Gregorius I Magnus, Homiliarum in Evangelia, II/XXXIV, Sunday Sermons III, trans. Toal 1959, 201-202).    

Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
|
Researcher
|
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
|
Language Editor
|
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.