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Name/Title
Rebbe's Kloyz in Sadhora | Unknown
Object
Object Detail
Settings
Unknown
Date
Between 1864 and 1881
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Unknown (Unknown)
Historical Origin
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Brick
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Subject
Unknown |
Condition
Restored in 2016
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Synagogue
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
B (Fair)
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style

Kloyz at the court of Sadigora Hasidic dynasty

Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration

Wall paintings

Urban significance
Significance Rating
3 (National)
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks

This Kloiz is one of the most important buildings of the Hassidic courts.  It represents and embodies the "royal" way of behavior, which characterized the Ruzhin-Sadgora dynasty. The Sadgora Kloiz served as a model for other buildings built by the members of the dynasty, especially the Kloiz in Chortkov, and also by members of rival dynasties, for example, Vizhnits.  Several Hassidic stories compare this building to theJerusalemTemple.

The Tzaddiks of the Ruzhin-Sadgora dynasty did not pray with their Hassidim, but had a separate prayer room near the main prayer hall.  This arrangement was started by R. Israel of Ruzhin and is noteworthy in all Kloizes of his descendants (Assaf, pp. 372-3, Even, pp. 3, 83, 153).

Since the women did not take part in the Hassidic rituals at all and especially in the "pilgrimages" to the Tzaddiks during Saturdays and Holidays, the women's section of the Kloiz, if it existed, served only women living in the court, i.e. the family members and servants.

Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
The building was a part of the court compound of the Tzaddiks of Ruzhin - Sadhora. Rabbi Israel Friedman of Ruzhin (1796-1850) established his court in the town in 1842, after his flight from Russia. This building is probably the New Kloiz, which was planned in the last years of R. Israel and was built by his son, Rabbi Avraham Yaakov of Sadhora (1819-1883). Hassidic legend tells, that when R. Israel of Ruzhin showed the plan of the building to the Tzaddik of Skvira, Rabbi Moshe, the latter became white as a wall and shouted: "Be merciful, Rebbe, and do not build this Kloiz." After R. Israel's death, the Skvirer Tzaddik explained his plea: He saw in the plan, that the Ruzhiner had in mind the same intentions (כוונות) as Moses when he was building the Tabernacle. He feared that after the inauguration of the Kloiz the same tragedy (קידוש השם) would befall them, as when the two elder sons of Aharon suddenly died. Rabbi Israel indeed did not built the Kloiz. His son, Rabbi Avraham Yaakov hoped, that with the power of his father and with his own power he would be able to protect his children from that fate. Nonetheless, the good deeds (זכות) of the two great Tzaddiks could not protect them. Within two years, 1882 and 1883, two elder children of R. Avraham Yaakov, R. Shlomenu and R. Nahum Berenu died. Several months later the old Tzaddik also died (Even, pp. 84-85). There are other legends, stating that the Kloiz was previously the palace of Baron Mustatza, the owner of Sadhora, and that R. Israel of Ruzhin received it as a present or bought it (Asaf, p. 370). In 1882, a new steel Torah ark was made, following the desecration of the Torah scrolls during a robbery attempt of the Kloiz (Even, p. 216-7). The building also served the successive Sadhora Tzaddiks. In 1883-1886, two sons of R. Abraham Yaakov tried to live together in the town, but in 1886 Rabbi Itzhak (1850-1917) removed his seat to Boian, and Rabbi Israel (1852-1907) stayed in Sadhora. After his death, his sons Rabbi Aharon (1877-1913), Rabbi Abraham Yaakov (1884-1961) and Rabbi Shlomo Hayiim (1887-1972) became the Tzaddiks. The two latter left Sadgora at the beginning of the First World War and moved to Vienna. According to the testimony of Semion An-sky, the residence of the Tzaddiks was not damaged during the Russian occupation, although the town itself was plundered and destroyed. After World War II, the building was nationalized, and used for local purposes. In the 1960s-1990s, it was used as a workshop for repairing vehicles. Consequently, an industrial structure was attached to its east side, and new doors, walls and staircases were added. Since the late 1990s, the building has been abandoned and was deteriorating rapidly.
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography

Sergey R. Kravtsov, “Jewish Identities in Synagogue Architecture of Galicia and Bukovina,” Ars Judaica 6 (2010), p. 94.

Assaf, David, Derekh hamalkhut: r. israel miruzhin umekomo betoldot hahasidut (Jerusalem, 1997), pp. 367-373;

Bruckenthal, Leo, "Sadagura" in Hugo Gold (ed.), Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina, vol. 2 (Tel Aviv, 1962), pp. 98-105.

Even, Itzhak, Funem rebens hoif: zikhroines un maises (New York, 1922; reprint: Israel, 1970).

Ansky, Solomon, The Enemy at His Pleasure: A Journey Through the Jewish Pale of Settlement During World War I, trans. Joachim Neugroschel (New York, 2002), p. 281.

http://jewish-heritage-europe.eu/2016/11/06/synagogue-in-sadhora-ukraine-rededicated

Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
S. Sirota, S. Hlynka | 1992
Author of description
Vladimir Levin | 2001
Architectural Drawings
S. Sirota, S. Hlynka |
Computer Reconstruction
Zoya Arshavsky | 2001
Section Head
|
Language Editor
Sally Oren | 2001
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.
A181757