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Fol. 21v: A panel at the right of the text column and in the outer margin illustrates the text of "maror" (bitter herbs). A man is pointing with his right index finger at his wife, seated next to him on the same bench. The woman is wearing a yellow robe and a magenta mantle with gold powder lining; her hair is covered with a wimple reaching to her shoulders. The man wears a green robe and a two-tiered magenta hat. The floor has alternating dark and light blue tiles and a red wall decorated with feathery scrolls in red ink with yellow dots.

Acanthus leaves extend from the top and bottom of the panel into the outer margin.

See: General Document for acanthus branches.

Name/Title
The Tegernsee Haggadah | Unknown
Object Detail
Fol. 21v
Settings
Unknown
Date
Before 1489
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Origin
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Site
Unknown
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Germany | Munich | Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (BSB)
| Cod. hebr. 200 (Steinschneider 1895, No. 200)
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Black and brown ink, gold leaf and powder and different shades of blue, magenta, green, red, yellow, grey brown and white.
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
58 x 69 mm.; 5 lines high
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks

 

 

Fig. 1: Displaying the Maror

Yahuda Haggadah

Franconia, 1465-1470

Jerusalem, IM MS 180/50, fol. 21

(Narkiss and Sed-Rajna, IJA 1978/3)

Fig. 2: The Maror

Golden Haggadah

Barcelona, c.1320

London, BL Add. 27210, fol. 45v

(Narkiss, facsimile 1970)

 

 

 

 

Fig. 3: Man pointing at his wife

Tegernsee Haggadah

Munich, BSB Cod. hebr. 200, fol. 21v

 

Fig. 4: Displaying the Maror;

Man pointing at his wife

Rylands Sephardi Haggadah

Barcelona, c.1360

London, BL Or. 1404, fol. 18

(Loewe, facsimile 1988)

Fig. 5: Displaying the Maror; Man touching his wife's head

TheWashingtonHaggadah  Joel ben Simeon (scribe and artist)

Germany (?), 1478

Washington, Library of Congress, Hebraic Section, MS 1, fol. 16

(Weinstein (ed.), facsimile 1991)

Fig. 6: Displaying the Maror;

Man and wife pointing at each other

Hileq and Bileq Haggadah

South Germanysecond half of the 15th century

Paris, BnF hébr. 1333

fol. 19v

(Narkiss and Sed-Rajna, IJA 1978/1)

 

The illustration for "maror" (bitter herb), which is held up while reciting "This bitter herb …" is usually found in Sephardi and Ashkenazi haggadot of all periods. In both traditions the display of the maror is depicted similarly to that of the mazzah (see fol. 21): in the Ashkenazi haggadot it is usually held up by a man shown in the margin (fig. 1), whereas in the Sephardi haggadot it is a large ornamental plant in the centre of the page (fig. 2). In the Tegernsee Haggadah (fig. 3) the artist was satisfied with indicating the wife as a bitter herb, omitting a plant.

This gesture, which also appears in other haggadot (figs. 4-6), refers to the embittered relations between man and wife, alluding to Eccles. 7:26: "and I find more bitter than death the woman" (Narkiss 1991, pp. 73-74). This iconography appears as early as the 14th century in Sephardi and Provençal haggadot (fig. 4, and Sassoon Haggadah, fol. 114), and in 15th-century Italian and Ashkenazi haggadot (fig. 5; Rothschild Miscellany, fol. 160 and Second Darmstadt Haggadah, fol. 12). In the Hileq and Bileq Haggadah (fig. 6) the couple is inscribed, on the right above the man: "Says the picture: (when saying) 'this bitter herb' let me raise my voice. (Indeed), both this (lettuce) and this (wife) are the cause (of this bitterness)". The wife on the left is pointing back at her husband. On the left above her is inscribed: "The woman's answer: 'I thought you (yourself) were one of the (causes of bitterness)'. Then a third (man) comes and makes a stench between them" (Narkiss and Sed-Rajna, IJA 1978/1). 

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M000441.jpg