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© Bayerische Staatsbibliothek , Photographer: Unknown, 2008

Vol. I, fol. 44v: The initial word Veelleh (ואלה, And these are) of the book of Exodus and Parashat Shmot (Ex. 1:1 - 6:1) is written above the illustrated panel in gold leaf on a magenta ground, across two text columns.

The illustratuon on a blue and green ground is of a scene which belongs to the previous Parashat                                                                                                                                                                            Vayiggash, in which Joseph welcomes his father and brothers toEgypt(Gen. 46:8-30). The text proceeds to list the brothers and all their families who accompanied Jacob. A similar but abbreviated list (Ex. 1-5; I:44v) begins the book of Exodus which opens with our illustration.

Joseph is standing at the tall yellow ochre gate ofGoshen, welcoming his old father, who is leaning on a stick, and ten brothers, two carrying sacks. Behind him is the townscape ofGosheninEgypt, shown as a complex of structures with a high tower, red-roofed buildings and a large edifice with biforae and an open gate.

Jacob, Joseph and all the brothers except two wear pointed Jewish hats, alternately laid with gold. Jacob and two of his sons each wear a long tunic and a two-coloured mantle in magenta and light brown, green and blue. The other sons are dressed in short tunics coloured magenta, red and green. Joseph, wearing a long red garment with a gold collar and cuffs is extending his right hand towards his father. Joseph, Jacob and four brothers are holding blank scrolls.

 

Name/Title
Munich Rashi's Commentary on the Bible | Unknown
Object Detail
Vol. I, fol. 44v
Date
1232/33
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Site
Unknown
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Germany | Munich | Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (BSB)
| Cod. hebr. 5/I-II (Steinschneider 1895, No. 5)
Material/Technique
Brown and black ink, gold leaf and blue, green yellow ochre, brown, red and magenta.
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
59 x 125 mm.
Condition
Although the faces have been erased, some features are discernible, especially those of Jacob.
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks

The composition of our panel (fig. 1) is similar to the scenes of the Children of Israel leaving Egypt or crossing the Red Sea in later south German illustrated manuscripts; see for example the World Chronicle of Rudolf von Ems of c.1300 from Zurich, especially the Exodus scene in the St. Gall copy (fig. 2). Another contemporary example is the Munich Chronicle from the Danube region, showing Moses and the Israelites (fig. 3).

 

 Fig. 1: Joseph welcoming his father and brothers to Egypt, Munich Rashi's Commentary on the Bible, BSB Cod. hebr. 5, I:44v   Fig. 2: Israelites Leaving Egypt  Rudolf von Ems, Zurich (?) c.1300 Munich, St. Gall, VadSlg MS 302, fol. 54v (Rudolf von Ems, facsimile 1982)

 

 

 

Fig. 3: Moses and the Israelites Rudolf von Ems, Danube region, c.1300, Munich, BSB cgm 6406, fol. 68 (Mellinkoff 1993, II, fig. III.61)

 

 Parallels to the townscape in our illustration (figs. 1, 4) are found in Latin manuscripts produced in Würzburg (see Metzger 1974, pp. 549-550), for example the Würzburg Psalter of 1250-60 (fig. 5).

 

 Fig. 4: Townscape, Munich Rashi's Commentary on the Bible Munich, BSB Cod. hebr. 5, I:44v    Fig. 5: Townscape, Psalter, Würzburg, 1260-1265, Munich, BSB clm. 3900, fol. 7 (H. Swarzenski 1936, Cat. 86, pl. 178, fig. 968)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Fig. 6: Joseph meets his Brothers in Egypt, Munich Rashi's Commentary on the Bible, BSB Cod. hebr. 5, I:39   Fig. 7: The Israelites' donation to the Tabernacle Munich Rashi's Commentary on the Bible Munich,  Munich, BSB Cod. hebr. 5, I:63a 

 

Although Joseph is standing, there is a close affinity in composition between our panel (fig. 1) and those illustrating Joseph and his brothers in Egypt (fol. I:39 – fig. 6) and the Israelites before Moses (fol. I:63a – fig. 7). This suggests three variations of a compositional formula, where the dress, posture and gestures of figures standing in a row in front of an authority are similarly rendered.

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