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Obj. ID: 42814
Modern Jewish Art
  Martyrs’ Memorial in the Anshe Emet Synagogue, Chicago, USA

© Samuel D. Gruber, Photographer: Gruber, Samuel D., 2021

Who is Commemorated?

Six million Jewish martyrs

Description:

A wall in the entrance lobby of the synagogue is sheathed in white marble slabs, inscribed with a scriptural passage and a memorial dedication. Attached to the left is a large abstract metal relief sculpture. An attached plaque identifies the donor, The lower part of the sculpture undulates like crumpled or piled drapery. The upper part and along the upper edge has sixteen tubular upward extensions. These could be more folds, but they take on the forms of upraised arms, and also chimneys. In the center on metal fold created what appears to be a hooded figure or the ghost of a figure with arms outstretched.

Inscription

Top right:

“Oh, that my head were waters
and mine eyes a fountain of tears,
That I might weep day and night
for the slain of my people!"
Jeremiah 8:23

Bottom left:

In the dreadful era of Nazi infamy six million of our people were brutally annihilated.
Neither time nor distance shall dim their precious memory. Their martyrdom
remain a solemn admonition to the conscience of mankind, never to be silent
in the face of tyranny and injustice, anywhere on earth.

An attached metal plaque reads:

Martyr’s Memorial
Presented by
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lewis
of Dallas, Texas

Commissioned by

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lewis

10 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Martyrs’ Memorial in the Anshe Emet Synagogue, Chicago | Unknown
Object Detail
Monument Setting
Synagogue (active)
{"10":"Any immovable marker or memorial that specifically references the Holocaust."}
Date
ca. 1960
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Pattison, Abbott Lawrence (sculptor)
(Unknown)
{"3787":"American, 1916-1999"}
Origin
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Unknown |
Congregation
Unknown
Location
United States of America (USA) | Illinois | Chicago, IL
| Anshe Emet Synagogue, 3751 N. Broadway
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
marble, metal
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Iconographical Subject
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance

Paul Lewis (1900-1984), descended from a line of rabbis, emigrated from Poland to the United States in 1922. He moved to Marfa, Texas in 1944 where he owned a clothing store, and he subsequently moved to Dallas. Many family members in Poland were killed in the Holocaust and in 1959 he began to sponsor Holocaust memorials in synagogues, and then to organize memorial days on the 20th and 30th anniversaries of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, on which occasions he published commemorative editions of the Passover Hagadah. In all, he built 15 memorials in synagogues, schools, and museums in the United States and he was appointed in 1976 by President Jimmy Carter to serve on the first United States Holocaust Commission. Among his many philanthropic works, he established the first Chair in Holocaust Studies at Yeshiva University in New York. As of 2021, it is not known why Lewis chose Anshe Emet, a Conservative Chicago synagogue, as the place for this memorial.

Abbott Lawrence Pattison (1916-1999), who signed the relief sculpture, was a leading Chicago sculptor. 

Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography

Ornish, Natalie. “Lewis, Paul (1900-1985),” Texas State Historical Association Handbook of Texas , tshaonline.org (accessed January 5, 2022)
Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
|
Author of description
Samuel D. Gruber | 2021
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
|
Language Editor
|
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.