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Obj. ID: 353
Jewish Architecture
  Ades Synagogue in Jerusalem - Interior
To the main object: Ades Synagogue in Jerusalem

© Center for Jewish Art, Photographer: Radovan, Zev, 1982

The interior is a rectangular open space.

The Torah ark runs along the eastern wall facing the entrance, while the teivah is placed in the middle of the hall. They are all set in a central axis (entrance- teivah- Torah ark).

A wooden screen serving as the ark's façade is fixed in front of three original arched niches; A central large niche flanked by two side smaller niches.

A rectangular gallery runs along the west wall, above the entrance, facing theArk.

The wooden ceiling is trapezoidal and bears a rectangular vault in its center.

The sitting arrangement in the synagogue is around the walls (including the eastern wall), facing the teivah.

11 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Ades Synagogue in Jerusalem | *Architecture | Synagogue
Object Detail
Date
1901 (established), 1912-1913 (painted)
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
2000s
Artist/ Maker
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Location
Israel | Jerusalem
| Nahlaot (Nahlat Zion: 1 Be’er Sheba street)
Site
Unknown
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height: 5.30m (interior)
Width: 9.10m (exterior) 7.54m (interior)
Length: 12.30m (exterior) 10.75m (interior)
Height
5.30m (interior)
Length
Width
9.10m (exterior) 7.54m (interior)
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Iconographical Subject
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Axis: West-East
Facade: West
Entrance: West
Torah ark: East
Apse: Not relevant
Niche: Three niches - East
Bimah: Central
Platform: Not relevant
Seats: Around the walls facing the Reader's desk; along the eastern wall
Women’s section: West
Prayer: Facing East
Jerusalem: East, Temple site.
Façade (main)
West
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
East
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
West-East
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
western gallery
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program

The synagogue’s walls and ceiling are covered with wall paintings, comprising the signs of the Tribes of Israel – at the upper register of the northern, eastern and western walls, read counter clockwise, around the synagogue, from the south - western corner.

The Zodiac signs are set between the windows at the northern and western walls.

The Seven species are flanking the Tribes.

The motifs are set against a carpet like background, composed of Stars of David, seven branched Menorahs, branches and flowers.

Biblical citations written in a Bezalel stylised Hebrew characters, are inscribed around the walls, at their upper part.

A central framed square on the ceiling is painted with stars set against a blue sky, while flowering scrolls runs along the wooden beams above the prayer hall and in the women’s gallery. A grey paint covers today the scrolls and only traces are apparent.  

The four Mishnaic animals – no traces of these animals are apparent, though the elders of the synagogue testify that such animals were depicted on the gallery’s ceiling. 

Summary and Remarks

The Nahlat Zion neighborhood was one of the first Jewish neighborhoods built outside the old city. It was established by Albert Antebi in 1893 and was intended for poor workers and artists. Nahlat Zion became to be one of the main neighborhoods of the Aleppo community although other communities such as Kurdish and Urfa, and Jerusalemite Sephardi, also lived there.  

Schur,Jerusalem, p. 725.

Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography
Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
|
Author of description
Efrat Assaf-Shapira | 11.1998
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
|
Language Editor
|
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.