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Obj. ID: 8400
Jewish Architecture
  Synagogue on Horkoho St. in Pishchanka, Ukraine

© Center for Jewish Art, Photographer: Ukrzakhidprojectrestavratsiia, 1998

The single story rectangular (elongated in west-east axis) building covered with hip-on-gable roof consists of two parts. 

The eastern part, which seems to be older (walls’ thickness is 0.82 m), is a rectangular hall.  It had two pairs of windows in the east wall, four windows and western doorway in the north walls and five windows in the south wall.  All the openings are with segmented arches and surmounted by slightly projecting architraves.  Probably, in the original plan include a prayer hall with twelve windows and a vestibule in the western end, which had a door on the north and a window on the south (compare with the other preserved synagogue in Peschanka).  The east facade is situated on the sloped surface, and thus is supported by a high basement.  In the centre of this facade, a thick semicircular projection indicates the interior placement of the Torah ark. This projection is supported by a low buttress.

The west part, which seems to be built later (walls’ thickness is 0.60 m) is a rectangular room, elongated in the north-south axis.  It has four windows in the west wall, three windows in the north wall and three windows and a door in the south wall. All the openings are with segmented arches, without exterior decorations.  The northwest and southwest corners of the building are decorated with rough rustication.

Currently, the interior preserves only one original wall, dividing the two volumes. New walls divide the eastern part into a corridor and four rooms and the western part into four rooms.  In the eastern part, two windows on the north facade and a window on the east facade are bricked up, the doorway on the north facade is converted into window and an easternmost window on the south facade is converted into a door.  In the western part, one window on each south and north facades are bricked up.  After 1996, a new barn was built along the west facade, thus the northernmost window was blocked and another window converted into a door.

Summary and Remarks

4 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
Synagogue on Gor'kogo St. in Pishchanka | Unknown
Object Detail
Monument Setting
Unknown
Date
1900?
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Unknown (Unknown)
Historical Origin
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Iconographical Subject
Unknown |
Textual Content
Unknown |
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
Material/Technique
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Brick
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Dwelling
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
C (Poor)
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
1 (Local)
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
Main Surveys & Excavations
Sources
CJA documentation; Jewish Cemeteries, Synagogues, and mass grave sites in Ukraine. United States Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad (Washington D.C., 2005); Beniamin Lukin, Alla Sokolova and Boris Khaimovich, 100 evreiskikh mestechek Ukrainy: istoricheskii putevoditel', issue 2: Podolia (Jerusalem - St. Petersburg, 2000), p. 235, 240; ГАХО КП, ф. 227, оп. 1, д. 8148 (CAHJP, НМ2/9039.2)
Type
Documenter
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Author of description
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Architectural Drawings
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Computer Reconstruction
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Section Head
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Language Editor
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Donor
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Negative/Photo. No.
The following information on this monument will be completed:
Unknown |