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  (XI) Obj. ID: 509 Tomb of the Kings,, Jerusalem, . // Unknown edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
6a Period Detail
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19 Remarks
20 Description

The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.


More Details...
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
45 Temp: Batch Number
|
46 Temp: Aleph Number
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
509
48 Temp: Addenda
OVRPO=ntl%3Atrue%2Cntl_localname%3Atrue%2Csubject%3A%2Csubject_detail%3A%2Cobject%3A%2Cobject_detail%3A%2Cmaker_profession%3Atrue%2Cmaker_name%3Atrue%2Cmaker_detail%3Atrue%2Cdate%3Atrue%2Cperiod%3Atrue%2Cperiod_detail%3Atrue%2Cphotographer%3Atrue%2Cphoto_date%3Atrue%2Corigin%3Atrue%2Corigin_detail%3Atrue%2Cschool%3Atrue%2Cschool_detail%3Atrue%2Ccommunity%3Atrue%2Ccommunity_detail%3Atrue%2Ccollection%3Atrue%2Ccollection_detail%3Atrue%2Ccopyright%3Atrue%2Csite%3Atrue%2Csite_detail%3Atrue%2Clocation%3Atrue%2Clocation_detail%3Atrue%2Cdescription%3A%2C&batch=0036&batch_num=018&

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

Less Details


Object's images (80 image(s))

      [1] [2] [3] [4]

(XXII) ID: 1902 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1902 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description <p><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">Addenda:</span><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">NO</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_NO_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;800</strong><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">HIS</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_HIS_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.</strong><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">LN</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_LN_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;ENG&nbsp;</strong></p>
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214036
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 036
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1902
48 Temp: Addenda
Addenda:
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1903 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1903 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Wreath |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description <p><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">Addenda:</span><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">NO</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_NO_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;800</strong><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">HIS</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_HIS_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.</strong><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">LN</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_LN_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;ENG&nbsp;</strong></p>
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214037
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 037
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1903
48 Temp: Addenda
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1904 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1904 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Wreath |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description <p><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">Addenda:</span><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">NO</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_NO_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;800</strong><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">HIS</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_HIS_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.</strong><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">LN</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_LN_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;ENG&nbsp;</strong></p>
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214038
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 038
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1904
48 Temp: Addenda
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1905 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1905 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Wreath |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description <p><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">Addenda:</span><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">NO</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_NO_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;800</strong><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">HIS</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_HIS_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.</strong><br style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;" /><span class="handy" style="font-size: 12px; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; cursor: pointer; color: #333333; line-height: 24px;" title="Press to select the value">LN</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px; background-color: #eeffee;">&nbsp;:</span><strong id="ijab_LN_0013311" style="color: #333333; font-family: arial, helvetica, miriad; font-size: 12px; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;ENG&nbsp;</strong></p>
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214039
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 039
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1905
48 Temp: Addenda
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1906 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1906 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description Addenda: NO : 800 HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214030
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 030
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1906
48 Temp: Addenda
Addenda:
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1907 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1907 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214031
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 031
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1907
48 Temp: Addenda
The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1908 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1908 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214035
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 035
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1908
48 Temp: Addenda
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1909 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1909 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214040
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 040
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1909
48 Temp: Addenda

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1910 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1910 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214032
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 032
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1910
48 Temp: Addenda
The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1911 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1911 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214041
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 041
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1911
48 Temp: Addenda
The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1912 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1912 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214042
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 042
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1912
48 Temp: Addenda
: The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1913 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1913 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Unknown |
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No. 214057
20 Description HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214057
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 057
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1913
48 Temp: Addenda
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG
HIS :
HIS :
HIS :
:HIS :

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1914 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1914 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Unknown |
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No. 214058
20 Description HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214058
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 058
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1914
48 Temp: Addenda
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

HIS :
HIS :
HIS :
:HIS :

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1915 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1915 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description NO : 800 HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214053
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 053
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1915
48 Temp: Addenda
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1916 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1916 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description NO : 800 HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214052
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 052
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1916
48 Temp: Addenda
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1917 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1917 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description NO : 800 HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214051
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 051
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1917
48 Temp: Addenda
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1918 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1918 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description NO : 800 HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214050
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 050
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1918
48 Temp: Addenda
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1919 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1919 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description NO : 800 HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214049
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 049
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1919
48 Temp: Addenda
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1920 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1920 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Unknown |
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No. 214054
20 Description HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214054
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 054
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1920
48 Temp: Addenda
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

HIS :
HIS :
HIS :
:HIS :

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 1921 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit
Category: Ancient Jewish Art
ID: 1921 Tomb of the Kings, , Jerusalem, edit  
Category: Ancient Jewish Art

General Document


2 Name/Title Tomb of the Kings | Unknown
3a Object Tomb (Architecture)
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date
6 Period Roman
7 Origin Israel/Eretz Israel | Jerusalem
|
8 Community Unknown |
9 Collection Unknown |
10 Location Israel | Jerusalem
|
11 Site Jerusalem
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No.
20 Description NO : 800 HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897. LN : ENG
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance

40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
214043
45 Temp: Batch Number
214 | 043
46 Temp: Aleph Number
0013311
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
1921
48 Temp: Addenda
NO : 800
HIS : The King's Tomb is located in Jerusalem slightly north of Damascus gate on the road leading to Damascus. Much scholarly discussion has revolved around the issue of the site's identification as either the Tomb of the Kings of Judea or, as is generally accepted, the Monumental Tomb of Queen Helene of Adiabene. Historical sources which mention tombs in Jerusalem emphasize two: The tombs of the Kings of Judea and the Tomb of Helene of Adiabene. While the Tombs of the Kings of Judea is only given passing mention in historical sources without any mention of its architectural form, The tomb of Helene of Adiabene is described in great detail in many historical sources throughout the centuries. The first description of the Tomb of Helene is found in Josephus who described the Tomb as having three pyramids and located three "reis" (approximately 450m) from Jerusalem. In c.170C.E. Pausanius refers to the tomb of Helena but goes into no details. Eusebius, ca.330C.E., mentions the obelisks that can be seen before the gates of Jerusalem as being attributed to Helene, who was referrred to by "the Historian" (Josephus). In 390C.E. Hieronymos (Jerome?) refers to the mausoleum of Helena passed by S. Paula on her approach to Jerusalem. In the 5th Century, Moses Choronensis, an Armenian comments on a remarkable monument located near the gates of the city. In 1310C.E. Marinus Sanotos mentions the Tomb of Helene near the northern gates of the city. The first source refering to the site as the tombs of the Kings was Rabbi Yitzhak Hilo who,in 1334, described the tombs of the Kings of Judea...situated near the cave of Ben Sira, as one of the four wonders of the holy city. In 1561, Jacob Wormbser ventured outside the city walls and described a tomb carved in the rock with sculpted stone doors and related that the site was identified with the resting place of the Kings of Judea. Christopher Furer in 1566 writes of the elaborate tombs carved in rock with chambers and doors located between the Hinom and Kidron valleys and relates that they are reputed to be the tombs of Jewish kings. The first detailed descriptions are available only from the end of the 16th century and in these descriptions are called the tombs of the Kings. From then on travellers and scholars continue to describe the outstanding tomb north of Jerusalem not far from the gate of Ephraim (Damascus). These included Bernardino Amico da Gallipoli in the late 16th Century, Johannes Cotovicus (1548) Radzivill, Zwinner, D'Arvieux, Giovanni Zuallardo in 1586, Francisco Quaresmio in 1616, Mariti in 1767, Shultz in 1754. Drawings of the site extant are by Pococke in 1738 (an idealized drawing), by L.F. Cassas in 1772, an unknown artist from 1803, D. Roberts in 1855 and Ermete Pierotti in 1864. The site was first photographed in 1865. From this documentation it arises that the present state of the tomb facade is the same as it has been since the 17th century. The first plans of the Tomb of Helene are from B. A. da Gallipoli in 1596. Plans are also extant by Pococke (1738), Pierotti (1860), Robinson ( ), , Wilson (1865) The site was visited as well by Maundrell (1647? or 1697?), Maritti? (1760-1768), C. Niebuhr (1766), Corneille Le Brun (1672) De Binos (1778), W. Krafft (1845), Pfennigsdorf (1905), E. Brandenburg (). . De Saulcy who considered the site only as the king's tomb is credited with undertaking the cleanup of the fallen debris covering the tomb in 1863. The site was surveyed by K. Shick and Ch.Warren - published 1897.
LN : ENG

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a



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