Home
    Under Reconstruction!
Object Alone */

Obj. ID: 17521
Jewish Architecture
  3D computer model of the Cemetery chapel in Chemnitz, stage of 1924, Germany, 1924

© Center for Jewish Art, Photographer: Unknown,

From 1924 to 1928, the main hall was enlarged towards the west, nearly doubling in size (inner measurements: 6.70 x 6.70 5.10 x 8.70 m [full-length 11.70 m]), with a large new polygonal apse (3.00 x 5.10 m).  The two flanking wings remained the same size as in the building of 1882, though doors were opened in the south wing. The ceiling was changed from a mirrored vaulting to a double mirrored one. In the east facade, a vestibule was added (2.10 x 2.80 m), flanked by two small service rooms (2.00 x 1.80 m each).  These seem to be an afterthought, because they do not feature in the original enlargement plan.  Moreover, the fact that the front socle of the vestibule continues from its south corner to the inner wall of its adjacent south room suggests, that the vestibule was built first, before the planning of the side rooms.  Another significant change of plan is seen in the large apse, which received an upper round window instead of an elongated narrow window on either side.

The east facade has an entrance door to the vestibule, with a semi-round window on either side, for the two added service rooms.  Two upper twin windows flank the roof of the vestibule, which has semi-round windows fixed in its three sides.  The side wings each retain the large, arched window.

The addition to the main hall has on the north and south walls a triple window, its central part topped by a semi-round one.  The two chimneys, which jut each from the north and south common walls of the main hall and adjacent wings, were shortened.

On the west wall, the polygonal apse has a round window, and the side wings have each a large arched window. 

On the south wall, a door was opened in the apse, another in one of the rooms of the south wing, and yet another in the south wall of the vestibule’s service room.  In addition, connecting doors were added in the south wing between the two rooms and towards the main hall.

On the north wall, the cleansing room retained the exit door and the window in the adjacent room.   Another door is on the north wall of the vestibule’s second service room.

Lending a unified impression to the building is the cornice on the added part of the main hall, which joins that of the wings and apse.  The hipped roof of the main hall and the half-hipped of the wings consist of a wooden paneled construction covered by slate.

13 image(s)

sub-set tree:

Name/Title
3D computer model of the Cemetery chapel in Chemnitz, stage of 1924 | Unknown
Object Detail
Monument Setting
Unknown
Date
1924
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Germany | Saxony (Sachsen) | Chemnitz
| Kassberg area; Jewish Cemetery “Am Laubengang”
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Brick and plastered walls, wooden roof covered with slates.
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
7.40 m
Length
Width
14.50 m
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Iconographical Subject
Unknown |
Condition
Extant
Yes
Documented by CJA
Yes
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
West
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
East-West
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
West
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Southeast
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
I. The burial society Hevra Kadisha submitted a request for a building permit for a cemetery hall on February 27, 1882. In March 1882, the Royal District Administrator approved the request. Involved in the construction were Dresel, Landsberg and Levy – members of the Jewish community of Chemnitz, the contractor Ernst Sänger and the architect, possibly Reisig, who signed the construction drawings. In the course of that year, 1882, the chapel in the Jewish cemetery, parcel number 293, was built. II. In 1924, new plans to enlarge the cemetery chapel were prepared by the architects Naumann and Kalitzki. While the building was going on, the plan was somewhat altered and renovations were completed in 1928. The building was confiscated in 1943, and was to be demolished in 1944. Instead, it was rented by Auto-Union A-G until July 1945. That year, the building was given back to the Jewish community in Chemnitz, but the place was plundered two years later. In 1949, permission was granted for its reuse as a cemetery chapel. III. The building of 1924, given back to the Jewish community in 1945, was renovated as follows: In 1955 the old heating system was changed, and a proposal for installing a gas exhaust chimney was submitted. In 1968 the building was renovated. In 1997 the facades and roof were renovated.
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography
The Building Authority’s Archives of Chemnitz, parcel Nos. 293 and 295. The Municipal Archives of Chhhjemnitz, Jüdischer Friedhof Chemnitz 1945-1990, file 10156. Diamant, Adolf, Chronik der Juden in Chemnitz (Frankfurt am Main, 1970), pp. 19-20. Zeugnisse Jüdischer Kultur: Erinnerungsstätten in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Brandenburg, Berlin, Sachsen-Anhalt, Sachsen und Thüringen (Berlin, 1992), pp. 217-221.
Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
Alice Laser and Mario Schneidereit, TU Dresden | 1999
Author of description
Alice Laser and Mario Schneidereit, TU Dresden | 1999
Architectural Drawings
Alice Laser and Mario Schneidereit, TU Dresden | 1999
Computer Reconstruction
Vladimir Levin | 2000
Section Head
Aliza Cohen-Mushlin | 2000
Language Editor
Dvora Sax | 2000
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.