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  (XI) Obj. ID: 11020 Magen HaBrit ,, Tunis, 20th century. // Unknown edit  
Category: Sacred and Ritual Objects


2 Name/Title Magen HaBrit | Unknown
3a Object Circumcision shield
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date 20th century
6 Period Husseinite Dynasty under French Rule (1881-1956)
6a Period Detail
7 Origin Tunisia | Tunis
|
8 Community North African | Tunisian
|
9 Collection Israel | Sc_082
| 17
10 Location Unknown |
11 Site Unknown
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date 1992
19 Negative/ Photo. No. 43-42
19 Remarks
20 Description

The circumcision shield is a rounded oval plate with a central slit and a small rectangular handle on top. Its front face is decorated with a dedicatory inscription and two leafy branches.

The dedication is engraved in square Hebrew letters, and reads:

"כבוד/ אליהו אנבי (הנביא)/ יוסף די נסים/ שמלה ס"ט (סופו טוב)."

"(Made for) the honour of the prophet Elijah, Joseph (son) of Nissim Shamla, may his end be well." 


More Details...
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
  1. The circumcision shields all over the world are similarly shaped, with minor changes. Their shape is attuned to their function as the protectors of the baby's glans during the removal of the foreskin. The shields differ in their decorations which usually define their origin. Each community embellished the implements according to its characteristic style (figs. 1, 2; Berger, "Instruments," 1997, p. 40, fig. 12). In North Africait was also customary to inscribe the name of the mohel on the implements he used. For comparisons see the blades used by the mohalim Jacob Zror and Abraham Isaac, who were both active in Tunis in the beginning of the 20th century. For their implements, see: Circumcision knife, Sc.82(PC)-16, and Eudel, Dictionnaire des Bijoux, 1906, p. 164). 
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance
Nissim Shamla was a well known circumciser (mohel) in Tunis. He studied his profession from R. David Perez, who practiced his occupation as a mohel in the capital city at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. Perez had several students, among them Makhluf Elbaz, Jacob Hababo and Hai Levy, whose circumcision implements also survived, Sc.82(PC)-16.
Perez immigrated to Israel in the 1950s and continued to practice his profession till the day he died.
The shield was one of the circumcision tools of Nissim's son, Joseph, who learned his profession from his father.
40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
• Berger, Natalia. "Instruments for Circumcision-Ritual Objects or Surgical Tools?." In Rimonim (5, 1997). Ed. Sabar, Shalom, 29-42. Jerusalem: Society for Jewish Art. In Hebrew.
• Eudel, Paul. Dictionnaire des Bijoux de l'Afrique du Nord. Ernest Leroux, Éditeur, 1906. In French.
• Shalom, Sabar. "Pregnancy, Childbirth and Early Childhood." In The Life Cycle. Ed. Sabar Shalom, 14-91. Jerusalem: Ben-Zvi Institue for Study of Jewish Communities in the East, 2006. In Hebrew.
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
45 Temp: Batch Number
|
46 Temp: Aleph Number
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
11020
48 Temp: Addenda
OVRPO=ntl%3Atrue%2Cntl_localname%3Atrue%2Csubject%3A%2Csubject_detail%3A%2Cobject%3Atrue%2Cobject_detail%3A%2Cmaker_profession%3Atrue%2Cmaker_name%3Atrue%2Cmaker_detail%3Atrue%2Cdate%3Atrue%2Cperiod%3Atrue%2Cperiod_detail%3Atrue%2Cphotographer%3Atrue%2Cphoto_date%3Atrue%2Cphotographer_copyright%3Atrue%2Corigin%3Atrue%2Corigin_detail%3Atrue%2Cschool%3Atrue%2Cschool_detail%3Atrue%2Ccommunity%3Atrue%2Ccommunity_detail%3Atrue%2Ccollection%3Atrue%2Ccollection_detail%3Atrue%2Ccopyright%3Atrue%2Csite%3Atrue%2Csite_detail%3Atrue%2Clocation%3Atrue%2Clocation_detail%3Atrue%2Cdescription%3A%2C&

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

Less Details


Object's images (2 image(s))

     

(XXII) ID: 104489 Magen HaBrit , , Tunis, 20th century edit
Category: Sacred and Ritual Objects
ID: 104489 Magen HaBrit , , Tunis, 20th century edit  
Category: Sacred and Ritual Objects

General Document


2 Name/Title Magen HaBrit | Unknown
3a Object Circumcision shield
3b Object Detail
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date 20th century
6 Period Husseinite Dynasty under French Rule (1881-1956)
7 Origin Tunisia | Tunis
|
8 Community North African | Tunisian
|
9 Collection Israel | Sc_082
| 17
10 Location Unknown |
11 Site Unknown
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Radovan, Zev
18 Photograph Date 1992
19 Negative/ Photo. No.
19a Scan No. S046374
20 Description
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
  1. The circumcision shields all over the world are similarly shaped, with minor changes. Their shape is attuned to their function as the protectors of the baby's glans during the removal of the foreskin. The shields differ in their decorations which usually define their origin. Each community embellished the implements according to its characteristic style (figs. 1, 2; Berger, "Instruments," 1997, p. 40, fig. 12). In North Africait was also customary to inscribe the name of the mohel on the implements he used. For comparisons see the blades used by the mohalim Jacob Zror and Abraham Isaac, who were both active in Tunis in the beginning of the 20th century. For their implements, see: Circumcision knife, Sc.82(PC)-16, and Eudel, Dictionnaire des Bijoux, 1906, p. 164). 
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance
Nissim Shamla was a well known circumciser (mohel) in Tunis. He studied his profession from R. David Perez, who practiced his occupation as a mohel in the capital city at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. Perez had several students, among them Makhluf Elbaz, Jacob Hababo and Hai Levy, whose circumcision implements also survived, Sc.82(PC)-16.
Perez immigrated to Israel in the 1950s and continued to practice his profession till the day he died.
The shield was one of the circumcision tools of Nissim's son, Joseph, who learned his profession from his father.
40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
• Berger, Natalia. "Instruments for Circumcision-Ritual Objects or Surgical Tools?." In Rimonim (5, 1997). Ed. Sabar, Shalom, 29-42. Jerusalem: Society for Jewish Art. In Hebrew.
• Eudel, Paul. Dictionnaire des Bijoux de l'Afrique du Nord. Ernest Leroux, Éditeur, 1906. In French.
• Shalom, Sabar. "Pregnancy, Childbirth and Early Childhood." In The Life Cycle. Ed. Sabar Shalom, 14-91. Jerusalem: Ben-Zvi Institue for Study of Jewish Communities in the East, 2006. In Hebrew.
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
45 Temp: Batch Number
|
46 Temp: Aleph Number
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
104489
48 Temp: Addenda

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a

(XXII) ID: 104490 Magen HaBrit , Field documentation, Tunis, 20th century edit
Category: Sacred and Ritual Objects
ID: 104490 Magen HaBrit , Field documentation, Tunis, 20th century edit  
Category: Sacred and Ritual Objects

General Document


2 Name/Title Magen HaBrit | Unknown
3a Object Circumcision shield
3b Object Detail Field documentation
4a Artist/ Maker Unknown (Unknown)
5 Date 20th century
6 Period Husseinite Dynasty under French Rule (1881-1956)
7 Origin Tunisia | Tunis
|
8 Community North African | Tunisian
|
9 Collection Israel | Sc_082
| 17
10 Location Unknown |
11 Site Unknown
12 School/Style Unknown|
13 Iconographical Subject Unknown |
14 Category
17 Photographer Unknown
18 Photograph Date
19 Negative/ Photo. No. 43-42
19a Scan No. S110791
20 Description
21 Ornamentation
 
21 Ornamentation
22 Custom
23 Contents
24 Codicology
24a Scribes
24b Script
24c Number of Lines
24d Ruling
24e Pricking
24f Quires
24g Catchwords
24h Hebrew Numeration
24i Blank Leaves

25 Material/Technique
25a Material Structure
25b Material Decoration
25c Material Bonding
25d Material Inscription
25e Material Additions
25f Material Cloth
25g Material Lining
25h Tesserae Arrangement
25i Density
25j Colors

26 Measurements
26a Height
26b Length
26c Width
26d Depth
26e Circumference
26f Thickness
26g Diameter
26h Weight
26i Axis
26j Panel Measurements
27 Direction/Location
27a Façade (main)
27b Entrances
27c Location of Torah Ark
27d Location of Apse
27e Location of Niche
27f Location of Reader's Desk
27g Location of Platform
27h Temp: Architecture Axis
27i< Arrangement of Seats
27j Location of Women's Section
27k Direction Prayer
27l Direction Toward Jerusalem

28 Coin
28a Coin Series
28b Coin Ruler
28c Coin Year
28d Denomination

29 Signature
30 Colophon
31 Scribal Notes
32 Watermark
33 Hallmark
33a Group
33b Subgroup
33c Hallmark Identification
33d Hallmark Group Classification
33e Hallmark Reference
34 Trade Mark
35 Binding
36 Decoration Program
36 Summary and Remarks
  1. The circumcision shields all over the world are similarly shaped, with minor changes. Their shape is attuned to their function as the protectors of the baby's glans during the removal of the foreskin. The shields differ in their decorations which usually define their origin. Each community embellished the implements according to its characteristic style (figs. 1, 2; Berger, "Instruments," 1997, p. 40, fig. 12). In North Africait was also customary to inscribe the name of the mohel on the implements he used. For comparisons see the blades used by the mohalim Jacob Zror and Abraham Isaac, who were both active in Tunis in the beginning of the 20th century. For their implements, see: Circumcision knife, Sc.82(PC)-16, and Eudel, Dictionnaire des Bijoux, 1906, p. 164). 
38 Suggested Reconstruction
39 History/Provenance
Nissim Shamla was a well known circumciser (mohel) in Tunis. He studied his profession from R. David Perez, who practiced his occupation as a mohel in the capital city at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. Perez had several students, among them Makhluf Elbaz, Jacob Hababo and Hai Levy, whose circumcision implements also survived, Sc.82(PC)-16.
Perez immigrated to Israel in the 1950s and continued to practice his profession till the day he died.
The shield was one of the circumcision tools of Nissim's son, Joseph, who learned his profession from his father.
40 Main Surveys & Excavations
41 Condition
42 Biography
43 Bibliography
• Berger, Natalia. "Instruments for Circumcision-Ritual Objects or Surgical Tools?." In Rimonim (5, 1997). Ed. Sabar, Shalom, 29-42. Jerusalem: Society for Jewish Art. In Hebrew.
• Eudel, Paul. Dictionnaire des Bijoux de l'Afrique du Nord. Ernest Leroux, Éditeur, 1906. In French.
• Shalom, Sabar. "Pregnancy, Childbirth and Early Childhood." In The Life Cycle. Ed. Sabar Shalom, 14-91. Jerusalem: Ben-Zvi Institue for Study of Jewish Communities in the East, 2006. In Hebrew.
43a Short Name
43b Full Name
43c Volume
43d Page

44 Type
45 Temp: Batch Number
|
46 Temp: Aleph Number
47 Temp: Sys. Number / Doc. Name
104490
48 Temp: Addenda

Registrar
Function: Name: Date:
49 Documenter 49a
50 Researcher 50a
51 Architectural Drawings 51a
52 Computer Reconstruction 52a
53 Section Head 53a
54 Editor 54a
55 Donor 55a