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© “Synagogues in Lithuania: A Catalogue” Archives, Photographer: Červiakov, Vitalij, 2007

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The former shulhoyf of Old Žagarė, with the partially preserved building of the beit midrash, is situated some 300 m northwest of the Švėtė River and around 200 m from the Church of St. Peter and Paul. Local people recall that before WW II there were two synagogues in the shulhoyf, one of them demolished in the Soviet times, and a house built on its site. The beit midrash stands at the end of Trumpoji Street, on a plot slightly sloping eastwards, at the edge of the town, where the fields begin. The lack of sources does not allow speculating about the historical environment of the shulhoyf; however, the enclave of agricultural fields northeast of the former synagogue suggests that this was once a built-up territory, transformed after WW II when its Jewish inhabitants were murdered. Judging from the boulder masonry, the beit midrash was built in the late 19th century, as it was then that such structures became popular. As far as can be judged from the surviving parts of the original walls, it was a building of rectangular plan, consisting of a two-storey part in the west and a prayer hall on the east. The openings were segment-headed, framed with red brickwork, perhaps plastered over.

In 2007 the former beit midrash was a single-storey structure with a rectangular ground plan covered with a gable roof of asbestos sheets. The building has undergone significant transformations: only the stone walls are preserved from the original structure, while the upper part and the gable were made of silicate bricks in Soviet times. The southern façade has a protruding socle, higher on the eastern end as the site slopes eastwards. On the left, western side of the façade, an authentic segment-headed doorway with redbrick framing can be seen, while to its right, high in the middle part of the façade, are three segment-headed windows (today blocked with white silicate bricks). A wide rectangular gate has been cut into the eastern side of the façade. The eastern façade facing the street was symmetrical, featuring a high socle and two segment-headed windows. Today the windows are bricked up, and a low metal garage is attached to the left side of the façade. The northern façade had a doorway on the right and five segment-headed windows. Today all the openings are blocked, but it is clear that the northern and southern façades were symmetrical, and that the prayer hall was lit by twelve windows. The western façade is closest to its original condition – four oculi are arranged there in two tiers (today they are bricked up), and encircled with redbrick surrounds. The former beit midrash serves as a garage for agricultural machinery.

Text from Aliza Cohen-Mushlin, Sergey Kravtsov, Vladimir Levin, Giedrė Mickūnaitė and Jurgita Šiaučiūnaitė-Verbickienė (eds.), Synagogues in Lithuania: A Catalogue. vol. 2 (Vilnius: Vilnius Academy of Art Press, 2012).

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Name/Title
Beit Midrash at 31 Trumpoji St. in Old Žagarė | Unknown
Object
Object Detail
Settings
Unknown
Date
185?-1900?
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Unknown (Unknown)
Origin
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Lithuania | Šiauliai County | Žagarė
| 31 Trumpoji St.(Gedimino g. 13a)
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Subject
Unknown |
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography

Marija Rupeikienė, "Synagogues of Lithuania," in Lithuanian Synagogues (Exhibition Catalogue) (Vilnius: The Vilna Gaon Jewish State Museum, 1997), p. 31;

Marija Rupeikienė, Nykstantis kultūros paveldas: Lietuvos sinagogų architektūra (Vilnius, 2003), p. 98;

Pinkas hakehilot: Lita, ed. Dov Levin (Jerusalem, 1996), p. 278;

Rossiiskaia evreiskaia entsiklopediia (Moscow), vol. 4 - 2000, p. 436;

Aleksandr Belozorchik, “Mestechko Zhagory” [Townlet Zhagory], in Pamiatnaia knizhka Kovenskoi gubernii na 1899 god [Kovno province reference book for 1899] (Kovna, 1898), p. 35;

Y.D.Kamzon, Yahadut lita: tmunot vetziyunim (Jerusalem, 1959), ill. on p. 175 (int);

Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
“Synagogues in Lithuania: A Catalogue” project | 2007
Author of description
|
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
|
Language Editor
|
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.
A339403