Home
    Under Reconstruction!
Art Alone
© Alec Mishory, Photographer: Mishory, Alec,

The description is written by the researcher Alec Mishory. 

The prophet Amos was active during the reign of king Jeroboam II. He was from the southern Kingdom of Judah but preached in the northern Kingdom of Israel. Amos wrote at a time of relative peace and prosperity but also of neglect of God's laws. He spoke against an increased disparity between the very wealthy and the very poor. His major themes of social justice, God's omnipotence, and Divine judgment became staples of prophecy. He was admired for the purity of his language, his beauty of diction, and his poetic art, in which he used metaphoric objects to symbolically expand his prophecies. In a stained glass window dedicated to prophet Amos the artist includes a depiction of a plumb line, which stands for righteousness and honesty: "This is what the LORD showed me: The Lord was standing by a wall that had been built true to plumb, with a plumb line in his hand. And the LORD asked me, "What do you see, Amos?"  "A plumb line," I replied. Then the Lord said, "Look, I am setting a plumb line among my people Israel; I will spare them no longer (Amos, 7). Referring to people's greed he mentions sandals: "This is what the LORD says: For three sins of Israel,  even four, I will not turn back my wrath. They sell the righteous for silver and the needy for a pair of sandals” (Amos 2, 6). Fruits of the sycamore tree stand for Amos' simple, modest origins: "… Amos answered Amaziah, "I was neither a prophet nor a prophet's son, but I was a shepherd, and I also took care of sycamore-fig trees".  (Amos 7, 14). A shofar stands for God's wrath: "Hear this word the LORD has spoken against you, O people of Israel—against the whole family I brought up out of Egypt: …When a trumpet [shofar] sounds in a city, do not the people tremble? When disaster comes to a city, has not the LORD caused it?" (Amos 3, 1, 6).

Name/Title
Stained Glass" Amos, Prophet of Justice" in the Beth El Temple in Knoxville, Tennessee | Unknown
Object
Object Detail
Date
1954
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Origin
Unknown |
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Location
Site
Unknown
School/Style
Unknown|
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Unknown |
Material/Technique
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Condition
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Custom
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks
Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography
Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
|
Researcher
|
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconsdivuction
|
Section Head
|
Language Editor
|
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.
A397881