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Fol. 256v:

The page opening the seventh section of the SeMaK includes an architectural part-page panel occupying the upper part of the page filling the width of the text space, executed in the first stage of decoration. The panel is shaped on top as a Gothic tower decorated with crockets and contains within it a panel for the initial word, "to make the Kiddush, blessing over the wine". (לעשות קידוש) The word is written in gold and outlined in red, set on a blue ground framed by a gold border, forming four arches above and below the word, one of which accommodates the ascender of the letter lamed. It is illustrated on top by a crowned man appearing in the central window of the tower performing the kiddush for the Sabbath eve by raising a gold double cup (Doppelkopf), a well-known shape of a cup found in the first half of the fourteenth century.

The initial word panel is surrounded by five dragons on an alternating red and bordeaux checkered ground. Two winged dragons with leafy tails and leafy tongues flank the tower window, while three smaller dragons are set beneath the initial word panel. The one in the middle has a leafy tail and the other two are winged

Name/Title
Vienna Siddur-SeMaK | Unknown
Object
Object Detail
Fol. 256v
Settings
Unknown
Date
1st quarter of the 14th century; Additions in the second half of the 15th century
Synagogue active dates
Reconstruction dates
Artist/ Maker
Origin
Germany | Lake Constance (Bodensee) Area
Italy | Northern Italy
| ; Additions in Northern Italy
Historical Origin
Unknown
Community type
Congregation
Unknown
Site
Unknown
Period
Unknown
Period Detail
Collection
Austria | Vienna | Österreichische Nationalbibliothek (ÖNB)
| Cod. Hebr. 75 (Schwarz No. 88)
Documentation / Research project
Unknown
Material/Technique
Parchment, burnished gold, blue, red, green, yellow, bordeaux and black colours
Material Stucture
Material Decoration
Material Bonding
Material Inscription
Material Additions
Material Cloth
Material Lining
Tesserae Arrangement
Density
Colors
Construction material
Measurements
length X width mm
(?)
Height
Length
Width
Depth
Circumference
Thickness
Diameter
Weight
Axis
Panel Measurements
Condition
Good
Extant
Documented by CJA
Surveyed by CJA
Present Usage
Present Usage Details
Condition of Building Fabric
Architectural Significance type
Historical significance: Event/Period
Historical significance: Collective Memory/Folklore
Historical significance: Person
Architectural Significance: Style
Architectural Significance: Artistic Decoration
Urban significance
Significance Rating
Languages of inscription
Unknown
Type of grave
Unknown
0
Ornamentation
Dragon
Custom
Ashkenazi
Contents
Codicology
Scribes
Script
Number of Lines
Ruling
Pricking
Quires
Catchwords
Hebrew Numeration
Blank Leaves
Direction/Location
Façade (main)
Endivances
Location of Torah Ark
Location of Apse
Location of Niche
Location of Reader's Desk
Location of Platform
Temp: Architecture Axis
Arrangement of Seats
Location of Women's Section
Direction Prayer
Direction Toward Jerusalem
Coin
Coin Series
Coin Ruler
Coin Year
Denomination
Signature
Colophon
Scribal Notes
Watermark
Hallmark
Group
Group
Group
Group
Group
Trade Mark
Binding
Decoration Program
Summary and Remarks

The type of kiddush double cup (Doppelkopf) held by the man in this panel can be compared to similar contemporary drinking vessels from Lingenfeld in the Palatinate region of ca. 1330 (see Codex Manesse, exhib. Cat. 1988, p. 103, fig. 12). Both cups are wide and shallow with lids.

A similar lidded cup appears in Codex Manesse which was produced in Zürich, 1300-1340 (Heidelberg, Universitätsbibliothek, CPG 848, fol. 205). The wandering poet is depicted kneeling before the abbot, offering him a cup with an open lid.

Prof. Daniel Sperber quotes the Magen Avraham from Poland in the 17th century, who wrote:…כי טוב לקדש על כוס גדול שישייר מאותו כוס לקידוש היום ולהבדלה  ( It is good to bless over a large cup so that some will be left for the Sabbath morning kiddush and for havdalah), implying that the person who leaves wine over from kiddush to havdalah is one of the three types to inherit the next world (Sperber, Customs of Israel, vol. 6. 1998, pp. 125-8). However, since they feared that pests or poisons such as snake venom may get into the uncovered wine, they used lidded cups. Prof. Sperber notes that not many of these kiddush cups have remained and the ones known from Germany and Eastern Europe from the 16th century on, and most probably were used by worshippers in synagogue. It seems, therefore, that the illustration of the man blessing over the lidded cup in the Vienna SeMak precedes those finds (Strenthal, Hebrew Illuminated, 2000).

 

Suggested Reconsdivuction
History/Provenance
Main Surveys & Excavations
Bibliography
Sperber, Customs of Israel, vol. 6, 1998, pp. 125-128 (in Hebrew). M. Sternthal, "Hebrew Illuminated Manuscripts in the Austrian National Library of Vienna" Center for Jewish Art: Newsletter 15 (2000), pp. 13-15.
Short Name
Full Name
Volume
Page
Type
Documenter
Alissia Fried Yaffa Levy | 1998 1999
Researcher
Yafa Levy Guinat Spiegel, Estherlee Kanon | 1999 2002, 2008
Architectural Drawings
|
Computer Reconstruction
|
Section Head
Michal Sternthal | 2002
Language Editor
Judith Cardozo | 2002
Donor
|
Negative/Photo. No.